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I am trying to generate a self-signed certificate with OpenSSL with SubjectAltName in it.While I am generating the csr for the certificate, my guess is I have to use v3 extensions of OpenSSL x509. I am using :

openssl req -new -x509 -v3 -key private.key -out certificate.pem -days 730

Can someone help me with the exact syntax?

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1  
Also see How to create a self-signed certificate with openssl? It provides the information to create a certificate with the Subject Alternate Name, and tells you other rules that apply so that the certificate will have the greatest chance of success with browsers and other user agents. – jww Jun 22 '15 at 16:04
up vote 40 down vote accepted

Can someone help me with the exact syntax?

Its a three step process, and it involves modifying openssl.cnf file. You might be able to do it with only command line options, but I don't do it that way.

Find your openssl.cnf file. It is likely located in /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf:

$ find /usr/lib -name openssl.cnf
/usr/lib/openssl.cnf
/usr/lib/openssh/openssl.cnf
/usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf

On my Debian system, /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf is used by the built-in openssl program. On recent Debian systems it is located at /etc/ssl/openssl.cnf

You can determine which openssl.cnf is being used by adding a spurious XXX to the file and see if openssl chokes.


First, modify the req parameters. Add an alternate_names section to openssl.cnf with the names you want to use. There are no existing alternate_names sections, so it does not matter where you add it.

[ alternate_names ]

DNS.1        = example.com
DNS.2        = www.example.com
DNS.3        = mail.example.com
DNS.4        = ftp.example.com

Next, add the following to the existing [ v3_ca ] section. Search for the exact string [ v3_ca ]:

subjectAltName      = @alternate_names

You might change keyUsage to the following under [ v3_ca ]:

keyUsage = digitalSignature, keyEncipherment

digitalSignature and keyEncipherment are standard faire for a server certificate. Don't worry about nonRepudiation. Its a useless bit thought up by comp sci guys who wanted to be lawyers. It means nothing in the legal world.

In the end, the IETF (RFC 5280), Browsers and CAs run fast and loose, so it probably does not matter what key usage you provide.


Second, modify the signing parameters. Find this line under the CA_default section:

# Extension copying option: use with caution.
# copy_extensions = copy

And change it to:

# Extension copying option: use with caution.
copy_extensions = copy

This ensures the SANs are copied into the certificate. The other ways to copy the dns names are broken.


Third, generate your self-signed:

$ openssl genrsa -out private.key 3072
$ openssl req -new -x509 -key private.key -sha256 -out certificate.pem -days 730
You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated
into your certificate request.
What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN.
...

Finally, examine the certificate:

$ openssl x509 -in certificate.pem -text -noout
Certificate:
    Data:
        Version: 3 (0x2)
        Serial Number: 9647297427330319047 (0x85e215e5869042c7)
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
        Issuer: C=US, ST=MD, L=Baltimore, O=Test CA, Limited, CN=Test CA/emailAddress=test@example.com
        Validity
            Not Before: Feb  1 05:23:05 2014 GMT
            Not After : Feb  1 05:23:05 2016 GMT
        Subject: C=US, ST=MD, L=Baltimore, O=Test CA, Limited, CN=Test CA/emailAddress=test@example.com
        Subject Public Key Info:
            Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption
                Public-Key: (3072 bit)
                Modulus:
                    00:e2:e9:0e:9a:b8:52:d4:91:cf:ed:33:53:8e:35:
                    ...
                    d6:7d:ed:67:44:c3:65:38:5d:6c:94:e5:98:ab:8c:
                    72:1c:45:92:2c:88:a9:be:0b:f9
                Exponent: 65537 (0x10001)
        X509v3 extensions:
            X509v3 Subject Key Identifier: 
                34:66:39:7C:EC:8B:70:80:9E:6F:95:89:DB:B5:B9:B8:D8:F8:AF:A4
            X509v3 Authority Key Identifier: 
                keyid:34:66:39:7C:EC:8B:70:80:9E:6F:95:89:DB:B5:B9:B8:D8:F8:AF:A4

            X509v3 Basic Constraints: critical
                CA:FALSE
            X509v3 Key Usage: 
                Digital Signature, Non Repudiation, Key Encipherment, Certificate Sign
            X509v3 Subject Alternative Name: 
                DNS:example.com, DNS:www.example.com, DNS:mail.example.com, DNS:ftp.example.com
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
         3b:28:fc:e3:b5:43:5a:d2:a0:b8:01:9b:fa:26:47:8e:5c:b7:
         ...
         71:21:b9:1f:fa:30:19:8b:be:d2:19:5a:84:6c:81:82:95:ef:
         8b:0a:bd:65:03:d1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks noloader. I appreciate your reply. I did it the the same way. I was just thinking about a way of not updating openssl.cnf file for each IP Address (one of the fields I am updating in SubjectAlternateName) for every server. I had contacted a PEN Tester for his views too. As per him, keep updating the openssl.cnf file with a wrapper script which is fine but still becomes a hack. I was trying to find a way to pass subjectAltName as part of a command line command while using : openssl req -new -x509 ........... But I dont think that really exists. But I appreciate your help. – mohanjot Feb 4 '14 at 4:08
    
Yeah, its a hack because openssl ca and openssl req are kind of broken :( – jww Feb 4 '14 at 4:50
1  
By the way, if you want to write your own program to do it, it will work. See the demos mkreq.c and mkcert.c in the <openssl>/crypto/demos directory. – jww Feb 4 '14 at 5:20
1  
I just copied that openssl file and adjusted it locally. Then generated everything with: openssl genrsa -out cert.key 3072 -nodes openssl req -new -x509 -key cert.key -sha256 -config openssl.cnf -out cert.crt -days 730 -subj "/C=US/ST=private/L=province/O=city/CN=hostname.example.com" – stwienert Mar 24 '14 at 16:35
4  
There's also a nice trick to make this more flexible using environment variables described here: subjectAltName=$ENV::ALTNAME (and set the env. var ALTNAME=DNS:example.com,DNS:other.example.net). – Bruno Nov 21 '14 at 20:39

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