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In python 2.6 under Linux, I can use the following to handle a TERM signal:

import signal
def handleSigTERM():
    shutdown()
signal.signal(signal.SIGTERM, handleSigTERM)    

Is there any way to setup a handler for all signals received by the process, other than just setting them up one-at-a-time?

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4  
The answer I believe is going to be "no" and certain signal can't even be trapped (SIGKILL). – Murali VP Jan 27 '10 at 17:22
up vote 18 down vote accepted

You could just loop through the signals in the signal module and set them up.

for i in [x for x in dir(signal) if x.startswith("SIG")]:
  try:
    signum = getattr(signal,i)
    signal.signal(signum,sighandler)
  except RuntimeError,m:
    print "Skipping %s"%i
share|improve this answer
    
Just what I was looking for, thanks! – Justin Ethier Jan 27 '10 at 17:51
    
You're welcome. Thanks for fixing the error in the program. :) – Noufal Ibrahim Jan 27 '10 at 17:54
4  
That should be RuntimeError, not RunTimeError. couldn't edit, as just one character change. – Toby Champion Sep 1 '11 at 4:14

If you want to get rid of the try, just ignore signals that cannot be caught.

def receive_signal(signum, stack):
    if signum in [1,2,3,15]:
        print 'Caught signal %s, exiting.' %(str(signum))
        sys.exit()
    else:
        print 'Caught signal %s, ignoring.' %(str(signum))

def main():
    uncatchable = ['SIG_DFL','SIGSTOP','SIGKILL']
    for i in [x for x in dir(signal) if x.startswith("SIG")]:
        if not i in uncatchable:
            signum = getattr(signal,i)
            signal.signal(signum,receive_signal)
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The code is not properly indented but I cannot edit it because SO don't let me make a change that small. All the for should be indented with one level of indentation less. – krenel00 May 10 '13 at 15:04

That code won't work in the current version of python. There are many variables starting with SIG with the same value. For instance, SIGHUP and SIG_UNBLOCK are both 1. The only way I could think of to get a list of actual signals was to just make it myself.

from signal import *    
signals = {
        SIGABRT: 'SIGABRT',
        SIGALRM: 'SIGALRM',
        SIGBUS: 'SIGBUS',
        SIGCHLD: 'SIGCHLD',
        SIGCONT: 'SIGCONT',
        SIGFPE: 'SIGFPE',
        SIGHUP: 'SIGHUP',
        SIGILL: 'SIGILL',
        SIGINT: 'SIGINT',
        SIGPIPE: 'SIGPIPE',
        SIGPOLL: 'SIGPOLL',
        SIGPROF: 'SIGPROF',
        SIGQUIT: 'SIGQUIT',
        SIGSEGV: 'SIGSEGV',
        SIGSYS: 'SIGSYS',
        SIGTERM: 'SIGTERM',
        SIGTRAP: 'SIGTRAP',
        SIGTSTP: 'SIGTSTP',
        SIGTTIN: 'SIGTTIN',
        SIGTTOU: 'SIGTTOU',
        SIGURG: 'SIGURG',
        SIGUSR1: 'SIGUSR1',
        SIGUSR2: 'SIGUSR2',
        SIGVTALRM: 'SIGVTALRM',
        SIGXCPU: 'SIGXCPU',
        SIGXFSZ: 'SIGXFSZ',
        }

for num in signals:
    signal(num, h)
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As of Python 3.5, the signal constants are defined as an enum, enabling a nicer approach:

import signal

catchable_sigs = set(signal.Signals) - {signal.SIGKILL, signal.SIGSTOP}
for sig in catchable_sigs:
    signal.signal(sig, print)  # Substitute handler of choice for `print`
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