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What would be the best way to send a message to the click event to find out from where it was called?.

$("#mybutton").click(function(ev){

   if (called from funcion One or Two){
     //my code
   }

});

funOne = function(){
  $("#mybutton").click();   
};

funTwo = function(){
  $("#mybutton").click();   
};

EDIT:

on a "trigger" I have a small solution, but depends on all implement the parameter "data"

EDIT (II):

My solution based on a '@Roatin Marth' Answer.

jQuery.fn.trigger = function(event, data) {

    var type = event.type || event,
        expando = "jQuery" + (+new Date);

    event = typeof event === "object" ?
    // jQuery.Event object
        event[expando] ? event :
    // Object literal
        jQuery.extend(jQuery.Event(type), event) :
    // Just the event type (string)
        jQuery.Event(type);

    if (!event.caller) {
        var xcaller = "";
        try {
            xcaller = arguments.callee.caller;
        } catch (ex) { };
        event.caller = xcaller;
    }

    return this.each(function() {
        jQuery.event.trigger(event, data, this);
    });
};


jQuery.fn.click = function(fn) {

    var returned = null;

    if (fn) {
        returned = this.bind('click', fn)
    } else {
        var event = jQuery.Event('click'), xcaller = "";
        try {
            xcaller = arguments.callee.caller;
        } catch (ex) { };
        event.caller = xcaller;
        returned = this.trigger(event);
    }

    return returned;
};
share|improve this question
    
is #myButton dynamically generated to the page, so there will be multiple instances of it or something? –  RSolberg Jan 27 '10 at 17:38
    
"$("#mybutton").click();" is called from multiple scripts, as the project is great, I need to know from that place is called. –  andres descalzo Jan 27 '10 at 17:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can pass data when triggering an artificial event, the catch is you can't use the shortcut functions like click(), but instead use trigger directly:

$("#mybutton").tigger('click', ['One', 'Two']);

Click handler:

$("#mybutton").click(function(ev, customArg1, customArg2) {
  customArg1; // "One"
  customArg2; // "Two"
})

Seeing as how .click() is just a shortcut to .trigger('click') anyway, you don't lose anything by doing it this way, just more keystokes ;)


Edit addressing comments:

the system is already written and is large enough to make a change in all scripts

In this case you might need to hack jQuery to capture arguments.callee.caller and pass it along to your handler:

jQuery.fn.click = function(fn) {
  return fn ? this.bind(name, fn) : this.trigger(name, [arguments.callee.caller]);
};

With that patch, code that calls .click() directly will now pass their calling function scope info on to your click handler, which now can do this:

$("#mybutton").click(function(ev, caller) {
   if (caller === funOne || caller === funTwo){
     //my code
   }
});

If what this says is true, then arguments.callee.caller is not going to be reliable in the future, but then, a hack is called a hack for a reason ;)

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I saw this option, but the system is already written and is large enough to make a change in all scripts –  andres descalzo Jan 27 '10 at 17:43

I believe, when you do a click based on your snippets it will always trigger:

$("#mybutton").click(function(ev){

   if (called from funcion One or Two){
     //my code
   }

});

and not any of that functions... ( anyone? correct me if I'm wrong... )

EDITED..

ahh.. I see now... you wanted it dynamic clicked... (thinking...)

share|improve this answer

You are looking for arguments.callee. Now form javascript 1.4 it was deprecated.

See here for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery to be the manager for the event, the caller is a jQuery method –  andres descalzo Jan 27 '10 at 17:50
    
@Teja: this doesn't work. click() doesn't actually call the handler directly. It goes through an entire jQuery internal code path. arguments.callee.caller is meaningless as is by the time the handler is reached. –  Roatin Marth Jan 27 '10 at 17:54
    
Hmm, yes I didn't think of that. –  Teja Kantamneni Jan 27 '10 at 18:12

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