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Specifically, I'm writing a script to make it easier to compile and run my C++ code. It's easy for it to tell if the compilation succeeded of failed, but I also want to add a state where it "compiled with warnings".

$out    # to avoid an "ambiguous redirect"
g++ -Wall -Wextra $1 2> out

if [ $? == 0 ]
then

        # this is supposed to test the length of the output string
        # unless there are errors, $out should be length 0
    if  [ ${#out} == 0 ]
    then
        # print "Successful"
    else
        # print "Completed with Warnings"
    fi

else
    # print "Failed"
fi

As it is, the failure case check works fine, but $out is always an empty string, though stderr is no longer displaying on the screen, $out is never actually set. If possible, I would also like stderr to still go to the screen.

I hope what I've said makes sense. Cheers.

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2 Answers 2

To capture in a variable and display on the screen, use tee:

out=$( g++ -Wall -Wextra "$1" 2>&1 >dev/null | tee /dev/stderr )

This throws out the standard output of g++ and redirects standard error to standard output. That output is piped to tee, which writes it to the named file (/dev/stderr, so that the messages go back to the original standard error) and standard output, which is captured in the variable out.

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That captures to $out, which was my main problem, though it does not seem to allow $? to get the exit status of g++, I assume this is because it's running tee after compiling. How else can I get this status? –  Dustin Jan 31 '14 at 20:52
    
The PIPESTATUS array will hold the exit status of each command in the most recent foreground pipeline, so following this assignment ${PIPESTATUS[0]} should hold the exit status of g++. –  chepner Jan 31 '14 at 20:57
    
PIPESTATUS always seems to hold a single 0, regardless of the exit status of g++. –  Dustin Jan 31 '14 at 21:19
    
Ah. The assignment itself is the most recent pipeline. It's a little ugly, but try out=$( g++... | tee ...; exit ${PIPESTATUS[0]}). This propagates the exit status of g++ to be the exit status of the assignment. Then you can check $? as before. –  chepner Jan 31 '14 at 21:44
g++ -Wall -Wextra $1 2> out

This redirects stderr to a file named out, not a variable named $out.

If you want to run gcc and see stdout and stderr on screen as well as save stderr's output, you could use a named pipe (FIFO). It's a bit roundabout, but it'd get the job done.

mkfifo stderr.fifo
gcc -Wall -o /dev/null /tmp/warn.c 2> stderr.fifo &
tee stderr.log < stderr.fifo >&2
rm -f stderr.fifo
wait

After running these commands, the warnings will be available in stderr.log. Taking advantage of the fact that wait will return gcc's exit code, you could then do something like:

if wait; then
    if [[ -s stderr.log ]]; then
        # print "Completed with Warnings"
    else
        # print "Successful"
    fi
else
    # print "Failed"
fi

Annotated:

# Created a named pipe. If one process writes to the pipe, another process can
# read from it to see what was written.
mkfifo stderr.fifo

# Run gcc and redirect its stderr to the pipe. Do it in the background so we can
# read from the pipe in the foreground.
gcc -Wall -o /dev/null /tmp/warn.c 2> stderr.fifo &

# Read from the pipe and write its contents both to the screen (stdout) and to
# the named file (stderr.log).
tee stderr.log < stderr.fifo >&2

# Clean up.
rm -f stderr.fifo

# Wait for gcc to finish and retrieve its exit code. `$?` will be gcc's exit code.
wait
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