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My issue is that an array I've bind'ed to an async function doesn't seem to get updated on subsequent calls of that function even though the bind'ed array is updated inside that function.

In the function below I call queryForData several times asynchronously. passing in History which is declared globally. LOG1 always prints out an empty array and LOG2 always prints out an array retrieved with correct data for that iteration. However, it doesn't seem to concat with the array retrieved in the other calls.

Please help

exports.callQuery = function(req, res) {
  var http = require('http');
  var history = [];

  // loop over all entries in "Stocks" collection
  // and call queryForData
  Stocks.find(function (err, stocks){
    stocks.forEach(function callback(entry){
        queryForData(entry, this.history);
        }.bind({history : history})
    );
  });

  // perform an HTTP request for data and call the callback 
  // function which concats the data arrays together.
  var queryForData = function(stockData, history) {   
    var options = {
      host: 'query.blah.com',
      path: '/blah'+stockData
    };

    var callback = function(response) {
      var str = '';

      //another chunk of data has been received, so append it to `str`
      response.on('data', function (chunk) {
        str += chunk;
      });

      //the whole response has been received, so we just print it out here
      response.on('end', function () {

        var data = JSON.parse(str);
        console.log("LOG1: ", this.stocksHistoryData);
        this.stocksHistoryData = this.stocksHistoryData.concat(data);
        console.log("LOG2: ", this.stocksHistoryData);

        }.bind({stocksHistoryData : history})
      );
    };
    http.request(options, callback).end();
  };
};
share|improve this question
    
I find that code really hard to follow, seems all over the place. – Evan Trimboli Jan 31 '14 at 23:54
    
I added some comments and changed the names of some variables to be more clear. – padawanlvn Feb 1 '14 at 0:04
    
adding comments and renaming doesn't help the fact that the code is poorly structured and difficult to follow. You don't describe what you want to achieve, but undoubtedly there's a much simpler and cleaner way to do it. – Stephen Thomas Feb 1 '14 at 0:20
    
Using Node.js: For each document in a mongodb collection, I need to call a REST api to get an obj array response. I then need one array returned composed of the results of all those arrays retrieved. – padawanlvn Feb 1 '14 at 0:26
    
Though this is outside my original issue, I would be very grateful if you can point out how I can better structure this piece of code. I'm always looking for advice. – padawanlvn Feb 1 '14 at 4:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

concat() returns a new array. So, you're overwriting the reference to the array with a new array that's never reachable outside that function's scope. It happens here:

this.stocksHistoryData = this.stocksHistoryData.concat(data);

Try replacing the above line with:

data.forEach(function(item){
    this.stocksHistoryData.push(item);
}, this);

That way you always build up the state of the existing array.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly it. As soon as I pushed onto the existing array, this worked perfectly. I guess I thought the outside scope still had a reference to the array that's newly created in this function. Now I know it just doesn't work that way. Thank you. – padawanlvn Feb 1 '14 at 4:51
1  
instead of data.forEach(...) you can use this.stocksHistoryData.push.apply(this.stocksHistoryData, data); – dherbolt Feb 1 '14 at 6:29
    
Oh that works even better! Didn't know that option existed! Thanks – padawanlvn Feb 1 '14 at 21:14

I can't help you debug your code, but I can answer the question you pose. In JavaScript, objects are always passed "by reference" rather than "by value." So, in the terms of your question, JS bind keeps a reference to obj.

share|improve this answer

You issue is that your queryForData function never even uses this so it is irrelevant whether or not you bind anything to the function or not. Also if you are going to use this.history it would be inside the queryForData function body, not arguments that are being passed to it. I believe this code should be changed:

// loop over all entries in "Stocks" collection
// and call queryForData
Stocks.find(function (err, stocks){
  stocks.forEach(function callback(entry){
      queryForData(entry, this.history);
      }.bind({history : history})
  );
});

to this:

// loop over all entries in "Stocks" collection
// and call queryForData
Stocks.find(function (err, stocks){
  stocks.forEach(function callback(entry){
      queryForData(entry, history);
      }.bind()
  );
});

This should work fine as objects (arrays are objects) are always passed-by-reference in JavaScript. That way every invocation of queryForData will reference the same history object that is passed as an argument.

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