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This is my first project using Grunt and Git. In my project I have '*node_modules*' directory that I created by command 'npm install grunt'. Now I want to publish my project to GitHub.

Should my project contains 'node_modules' or I should omit it? I am afraid that it makes the project scary for a developers who are unfamiliar with Grunt. In fact I am puzzled why you should install grunt for each project separately. Why it is not possible to install it globally?

Here is my installation: grunt-contrib-concat, grunt-contrib-jshint, grunt-contrib-qunit, grunt-contrib-uglify, grunt-contrib-watch.

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have you read this?: futurealoof.com/posts/nodemodules-in-git.html –  sircapsalot Feb 1 at 5:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason you should not install grunt and grunt plugins globally is because then you could only have 1 version of each installed at a time. While working with a team, it also means every single member of your team must be running the same version of grunt and each grunt plugin.

Coordinating these versions with a team and switching versions as you jump to different projects is a nightmare. The solution, install everything locally. It's just file space and most modules don't take a whole lot of space.

Most people don't commit their node_modules folder into github. Each dependency listed in your package.json can be installed again by typing: npm install in the same folder.

Use npm install grunt --save-dev to save to your package.json as you install plugins and modules.

The only sensible reason to commit node_modules, IMO, is with a private application and repo intended to be deployed to production. Where you want to be sure your dependencies are locked down and not breaking something upon push. There are still other strategies to avoid committing node_modules, even with this use case though (such as npm shrinkwrap).

In short:

  • If you're deploying an app and paranoid about locking down your deps, commit your node_modules.
  • Everything else, dont commit your node_modules.
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Excellent and comprehensive answer. Thank you very much. –  Dane Feb 1 at 23:21
    
Thanks but I find it somewhat strange that you assume people aren't trying to put their private application in production, this is the most common usecase right? The only sensible reason to commit node_modules, IMO, is with a private application and repo intended to be deployed to production. –  Sebastien Lorber May 19 at 8:58
    
Since the question started with This is my first project using Grunt and Git I assumed nothing. ;) –  Kyle Robinson Young May 19 at 14:34

@"The only sensible reason to commit node_modules, IMO, is with a private application and repo intended to be deployed to production."

I started with never committing my node_modules into repo and only commit changes in package.json. But turned out thats a really bad idea for a project with multiple developers and a handfull of experimental feature-branches. As the node_module folder is not versioned with git you end up needing to run npm install on every branch switch, because modules can differ between versions. A real nightmare...

You ll end up hearing "This crap doesn't work again!!", Only because one had updated a node-module in a feature branch. So i now recommend to include node_modules for projects with multiple developers and branches. Takes away a lot of pain...

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It usually makes it faster, for deployments for ex.

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