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When i run the following code i get correct answers for addition,subtraction,multiplication but division gives me wrong answer:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main()
{
    int num1, num2, add, sub, mul, div;
    printf("Enter numbers \n");
    scanf_s("%d %d", &num1, &num2);

    add = num1 + num2;
    sub = num1 - num2;
    mul = num1 * num2;
    div = (float)(num1 / num2);   // typecasting

    printf("Addition answer = %d \n", add);
    printf("Subtraction answer = %d \n", sub);
    printf("Multiplication answer = %d \n", mul);
    printf("Division answer = %.2f \n", div);

    _getch();
    return 0;
    }

enter image description here

what would be the reason of Division = 0.00??

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1  
Notice that <conio.h> is not a standard C header. It is specific to your implementation (and e.g. don't exist on Posix or Linux systems) –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 1 '14 at 7:51
    
Take the habit to enable all warnings in your compiler and learn how to use the debugger –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 1 '14 at 7:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted
div = (float)(num1 / num2);   // typecasting

is wrong, you should cast the operands

div = (float)num1 / (float)num2;

Of course, you should have declared

float div;

and with all warnings a good compiler (like GCC invoked as gcc -Wall -g) would have noticed the discrepancy for printf

Actually, you'll better use double instead of float since printf(3) with %.2f expects a double argument... (but a float value is promoted to a double one when passing arguments to printf ....)

So your code should actually be

double div = (double)num1 / (double)num2;
printf("Division answer = %.2f \n", div);

Read about floating point and the floating point guide and what every programmer should know about floating point

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.. Depends what is what to be achieved –  Ed Heal Feb 1 '14 at 7:51
    
Anyway a +1 as I think that is maybe the intended behaviour –  Ed Heal Feb 1 '14 at 7:52
    
"%.2f expects a double argument" sounds a bit misleading (to me). - You don't have to use double with "%.2f" because floats are promoted to double in the variadic argument list of the printf() call. –  Martin R Feb 1 '14 at 9:10

You declare div as an integer, but print it as a floating-point number. The binary formats of integers and floating point numbers are not the same, so it causes the wrong value to be printed.

Either declare div as a float, or print it as the integer it is.

You should build with more warnings, as this would have been the cause of two warnings: First the assignment of a float to an int, then the printing of an int as a float.

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:) i forgot to declare div as float thanks for correction :) –  TheSpy Feb 1 '14 at 8:14
float num1, num2, add, sub, mul, div;

needs to be a float or it will floor down to 0.00

Or you need to cast them with a float

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It is doing integer division. I.e whole numbers - then convert to floating point

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dev is defined as an integer, and then printed with a %f format. You need to define it as a float.

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No, as a double; see printf(3) - but the float -> double conversion would have happenned at argument passing... –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 1 '14 at 7:59
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main()
{
int num1, num2, add, sub, mul;
float div;
printf("Enter numbers \n");
scanf_s("%d %d", &num1, &num2);

add = num1 + num2;
sub = num1 - num2;
mul = num1 * num2;
div = (float)(num1 / num2);   // typecasting

printf("Addition answer = %d \n", add);
printf("Subtraction answer = %d \n", sub);
printf("Multiplication answer = %d \n", mul);
printf("Division answer = %.2f \n", div);

_getch();
return 0;
}
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First of all you declared div as integer. so If you will store division of two float number in integer variable then you will get wrong answer.

You should declare div as float. Like,

float div;

and your type conversion should like,

div = (float)num1/(float) num2;

Then you will get correct answer.

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