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I'm designing a pinball game for a Uni project in which there are supposed to be 2 modes: running mode and builder mode, whereby one can design/redesign the layout of the machine.

My initial thought was the State pattern - however, I'm concerned that the common interface between the states may contract them into implementing methods which are not appropriate to that state.

Eg. In the builder mode it would be wholly appropriate to set the position of a bumper or whatever; but in running mode it would be implemented as doing nothing or throwing an exception - which just seems nasty, especially if there are many such methods.

Is there a better design for this?

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Are you required to use a pattern? Two states does not justify this. –  ChaosPandion Jan 27 '10 at 19:35
    
not at all, but highly decoupled gets more marks –  Robert Jan 27 '10 at 19:39
    
I was thinking of 3 states, as it might be nice, not to switch to builder mode while a game is running... –  Robert Jan 27 '10 at 19:41
    
Actually, that's not really nasty - the code would just be documenting a state that's legal to the machine that doesn't accept the command in that state. However, it's probably not quite the right paradigm, especially if there's not a lot of overlap in functionality between the states. –  Steve B. Jan 27 '10 at 19:41
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... that's the question –  Dario Jan 27 '10 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your intuition is correct. The State pattern is helpful when a program can have many different states, each one supporting many of the same operations. For example a drawing program may have many different tools, but each one supports similar operations like putting the pen down or up, and drawing a line between 2 points.

In your case there are only 2 states, and they don't share much behavior. The main thing they share is common GUI operations which are probably already in a standard library. You do need to ensure that code for things like displaying the bumpers is not duplicated, but you can do that without the State pattern.

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A couple of years ago I had a similar assignment at university.

I would say using the state pattern is overkill for this, as well as not being entirely suited, as previously mentioned. What we did with this assignment is:

  • Use something above the different modes, which allows switching between them.
  • Each mode has no knowledge of the other mode, they don't make calls into each other.
  • They do share knowledge of the model though (which in your case would be the pinball board, with positions of the bumpers, balls, etc.), so when you switch between them they are consistent.
  • In terms of the GUI, each mode is basically given space to do it's thing. Like you say, each mode has different possible actions, so forcing them to share the same actions as part of a state pattern is "smelly".

Basically, as mentioned elsewhere, the two modes do not share enough commonality to really justify the state pattern here.

There is one possibility of applying the state pattern, which would make sense. Since it's a university assignment, there's likely to be credit for the thought and justification behind it. It is related to the "level above" I mentioned earlier. In my experience this was part of the GUI that was independent of the mode. It allowed things like closing the application, opening previous pinball configurations, and switching between the modes. What it could also do is show context dependent menu items. The state of the menus could be retrieved from the current mode. So the builder mode could include save and other builder specific actions, and the running mode could offer play/pause options. If you have spent the time investigating the state pattern, and wish for that to pay off, this would be a possible option.

P.S. Murray did seem enthusiastic about our use of design patterns at the time ;-)

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could you explain what you mean by "level above"? –  Robert Jan 28 '10 at 0:02
    
I was thinking in terms of an object containing a reference to both different modes, and allowing the ability to switch between them. The modes shouldn't know about how to switch between themselves, that is the responsibility of something "above" them. As a concrete example, if each mode was contained in a JPanel, the "level above" would be the JFrame that held references to both of them, and had a control (like a menu item) to switch between them. Does that make a little more sense? –  Grundlefleck Jan 28 '10 at 0:26
    
BTW: "level above" isn't a proper technical term (as you may have guessed), so it's not really Googleable. "The object that composes both of your mode objects" is probably closer towards the correct terms. –  Grundlefleck Jan 28 '10 at 0:32

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