Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class that is defined as the following:

template <class WidgetType>
class CometWidget : public WidgetType;

Inside a function I am doing this:

dynamic_cast<CometWidget *>(iter2->second.second)->changesCommited_();

and it resolves the CometWidget type, complies and run correctly.
The code runs inside the CometWidget class.
How on earth does this happen?
Why is that so? Should it even compile?

share|improve this question
1  
Can you add the function source code? If it's inside the declaration of CometWidget then you don't need to explicitly qualify the template (or whatever term you use to say CometWidget<...>). –  MSN Jan 27 '10 at 19:51
    
It is inside CometWidget. Add this as an answer and I'll upvote you. Do you know why it happens. –  the_drow Jan 27 '10 at 20:00
    
It's martian technology, don't ask ... –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 27 '10 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If it's inside the declaration of CometWidget then you don't need to explicitly qualify the template (or whatever term you use to say CometWidget<...>).

share|improve this answer
    
Could you show me the part of the standard that says so? –  the_drow Jan 27 '10 at 20:46
    

Very interesting indeed. It seems to me like an interesting compiler bug.

It is possible to deduce the correct argument of the CometWidget<> template - just the same way you can deduce template parameters of a function from argument list. If it would be static cast, it would be less surprising.

With dynamic cast, there's little expected to be in common between the source and the target type. So, such "guessing" might have occurred, but then it's not a rightful one.

What compiler is this?

share|improve this answer
    
It is VC++ 2008. See MSN's comment. Is he right? –  the_drow Jan 27 '10 at 20:01
    
@the_drow yes MSN is right. The "CometWidget" is called the "injected class name". If you write it from within the template, then it's equivalent to the name with the parameter list followed and names a type, not the template. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 27 '10 at 20:10
    
litb - add this as an answer and I'll accept it :) –  the_drow Jan 27 '10 at 20:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.