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How can I retrieve size of folder or file in Java?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 76 down vote accepted
java.io.File file = new java.io.File("myfile.txt");
file.length();

This returns the length of the file in bytes or 0 if the file does not exist. There is no built-in way to get the size of a folder, you are going to have to walk the directory tree recursively (using the listFiles() method of a file object that represents a directory) and accumulate the directory size for yourself:

public static long folderSize(File directory) {
    long length = 0;
    for (File file : directory.listFiles()) {
        if (file.isFile())
            length += file.length();
        else
            length += folderSize(file);
    }
    return length;
}
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10  
+1 like these ready to run examples –  stacker Jan 27 '10 at 20:31
11  
Be careful if you run this in the C: root directory on a Windows machine; there's a system file there which is (according to java.io.File) neither a file nor a directory. You might want to change the else-clause to check that the File is actually a directory. –  Paul Clapham Jan 27 '10 at 22:50
2  
Simple change to check the parameter to see if it is not a directory at the beginning of the method and return the length then the recursion is simpler - just add the call to self in the same method and then this supports passing in a file reference instead of a directory as well. –  Kevin Brock Jan 28 '10 at 7:48

You need FileUtils#sizeOfDirectory(File) from commons-io.

Note that you will need to manually check whether the file is a directory as the method throws an exception if a non-directory is passed to it.

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So what happens when file is not a directory ? when it doesn't exist ? etc - how awful docs –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Sep 20 '13 at 22:31
    
@Mr_and_Mrs_D - Just copy and paste the lines after the checkDirectory(directory); check. Just make sure that File.listFiles has children. Refs: FileUtils.sizeOfDirectory(), File.listFiles() –  Mr. Polywhirl Jul 15 at 1:02
public static long getFolderSize(File dir) {
    long size = 0;
    for (File file : dir.listFiles()) {
        if (file.isFile()) {
            System.out.println(file.getName() + " " + file.length());
            size += file.length();
        }
        else
            size += getFolderSize(file);
    }
    return size;
}
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1  
@Vishal your code need to have a simple fix, in the recursive call, you should add the size to existing size not just assign to it. size += getFolderSize(file); –  Teja Kantamneni Jan 27 '10 at 19:51
    
@Teja: Thanks for pointing out, but the changes will be in the if statement as well –  Vishal Jan 27 '10 at 20:54

The File object has a length method:

f = new File("your/file/name");
f.length();
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Using java-7 nio api, calculating the folder size can be done a lot quicker.

Here is a ready to run example that will also skip-and-log directories it can't enter. It uses java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong to accumulate state.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    long size = getSize("c:/");
    System.out.println("size=" + size);
}

static long getSize(String startPath) throws IOException {
    final AtomicLong size = new AtomicLong(0);
    Path path = Paths.get(startPath);

    Files.walkFileTree(path, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file,
                BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
            size.addAndGet(attrs.size());
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFileFailed(Path file, IOException exc)
                throws IOException {
            // Skip folders that can't be traversed
            System.out.println("skipped: " + file + "e=" + exc);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });

    return size.get();
}
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Is there an equivalent for this on Android development? –  android developer Apr 30 at 22:23
    
Is there a reason for using AtomicLong instead of just long? –  Lukas Schmelzeisen 9 hours ago

File.length() (Javadoc).

Note that this doesn't work for directories, or is not guaranteed to work.

For a directory, what do you want? If it's the total size of all files underneath it, you can recursively walk children using File.list() and File.isDirectory() and sum their sizes.

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In Java 8:

long size = Files.walk(path).mapToLong( p -> p.toFile().length() ).sum();

It would be nicer to use Files::size in the map step but it throws a checked exception.

UPDATE:
You should also be aware that this can throw an exception if some of the files/folders are not accessible. See this question and another solution using Guava.

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1  
i was looking into something similiar and ended up with the code in question: stackoverflow.com/questions/22867286/… , as you see there is another aspect of error handling also causing problems. –  Aksel Willgert Jul 15 at 7:39
    
@AkselWillgert Thanks, this is unfortunate and I've updated the answer. Now switching to Guava stackoverflow.com/a/24757556/1180621 –  Andrejs Jul 15 at 11:53

Here's the best way to get a general File's size (works for directory and non-directory):

public static long getSize(File file) {
    long size;
    if (file.isDirectory()) {
        size = 0;
        for (File child : file.listFiles()) {
            size += getSize(child);
        }
    } else {
        size = file.length();
    }
    return size;
}

Edit: Note that this is probably going to be a time-consuming operation. Don't run it on the UI thread.

Also, here (taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/5599842/1696171) is a nice way to get a user-readable String from the long returned:

public static String getReadableSize(long size) {
    if(size <= 0) return "0";
    final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB" };
    int digitGroups = (int) (Math.log10(size)/Math.log10(1024));
    return new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(size/Math.pow(1024, digitGroups))
            + " " + units[digitGroups];
}
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public long folderSize (String directory)
    {
        File curDir = new File(directory);
        long length = 0;
        for(File f : curDir.listFiles())
        {
            if(f.isDirectory())
            {               
                 for ( File child : f.listFiles()) 
                 {
                     length = length + child.length();
                 }

                System.out.println("Directory: " + f.getName() + " " + length + "kb");
            }
            else
            {
                length = f.length();
                System.out.println("File: " + f.getName() + " " + length + "kb");
            }
            length = 0;
        }
        return length;
    }
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