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So I have this class:

class Test
{
    private int field1;
    private int field2;

    public Test()
    {
        field1 = // some code that needs
        field2 = // a lot of cpu time
    }

    private Test GetClone()
    {
        Test clone = // what do i have to write there to get Test instance
                     // without executing Test class' constructor that takes
                     // a lot of cpu time?
        clone.field1 = field1;
        clone.field2 = field2;
        return clone;
    }
}

The code pretty much explains itself. I tried to solve that and came up with this:

private Test(bool qwerty) {}

private Test GetClone()
{
    Test clone = new Test(true);
    clone.field1 = field1;
    clone.field2 = field2;
    return clone;
}

I havent tested it out though, but am I doing it right? Is there better way to do that?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Normally, one would write a copy constructor for this:

public Test(Test other)
{
     field1 = other.field1;
     field2 = other.field2;
}

If you want, you can also add a Clone method now:

public Test Clone()
{
     return new Test(this);
}

Going even further, you could have your class implement ICloneable. This is the default interface a class should implement if it supports cloning of itself.

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it is so simple and i didnt think of this. i am so dumb :) –  foxneSs Feb 1 at 14:38
    
Am I missing something here? The title says "without executing constructor" and none of the code samples seems to implement the requirement. Either requirement needs change or the code. –  Vijay Gill Feb 1 at 14:43
    
@VijayGill i'll edit title just for you –  foxneSs Feb 1 at 14:47
    
@foxneSs It's indeed quite simple here, but bear in mind than cloning can be more complicated as soon as you've got object fields instead of ints. The distinction is irrelevant here, but in general there are shallow copies (copy the references only of fields) and deep copies (clone all the objects which are references by fields too), and particularly the latter might be a bit of work to create. However, there's no need to worry about all this right here and now. –  Matthias Meid Feb 1 at 14:54
    
@MatthiasMeid i didnt understand you much but i have to say i hate reference types so much. same with python's immutable types. they make problems out of nowhere. –  foxneSs Feb 1 at 15:04
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While there's an answer, which solves OP problem, I'll add another one, which answers the question. To get instance of class without executing its constructor, use FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject:

var uninitializedObject = (MyClass)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(MyClass));
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I changed title because it was wrong, sorry. I thought I needed what you gave but in fact I just needed to make clone –  foxneSs Feb 1 at 14:55
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