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I'm working on a couple of C++11 work queue classes. The first class, command_queue is a multi producer single consumer work queue. Multiple threads can post commands, and a single thread calls "wait()" and "pop_back()" in a loop to process those commands.

The second class, Actor uses command_queue and actually provides a consumer thread... besides that, the idea is that post() will return a future so that clients can either block until the command is processed, or continue running (actor also adds the idea of a result type). To implement this, I'm attempting to store std::promise's in a std::pair in the work queue. I believe I am fairly close, but i'm having a problem in the _entry_point function below... specifically, when I'm trying to get the std::pair out of the command queue I'm getting a "use of deleted function" compiler error... I'll put the actual error i'm getting from the compiler below the code (you should be able to save this to a text file and compile it yourself, it's stand alone c++11 code).

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <future>
#include <list>
#include <stdio.h>

template<class T>
class command_queue
{

public:
    command_queue() = default;
    command_queue( const command_queue& ) = delete;
    virtual ~command_queue() noexcept = default;

    command_queue& operator = ( const command_queue& ) = delete;

    void start()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        _started = true;
    }

    bool started()
    {
        return _started;
    }

    void stop()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        _started = false;
        _queueCond.notify_one();
    }

    void post_front( const T& cmd )
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        _queue.push_front( cmd );
        _queueCond.notify_one();
    }

    void post_front( T&& cmd )
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        _queue.push_front( cmd );
        _queueCond.notify_one();
    }

    void wait()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        _queueCond.wait( g, [this](){return !this->_queue.empty() ? true : !this->_started;});
    }

    T pop_back()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::recursive_mutex> g( _queueLock );
        auto val = _queue.back();
        _queue.pop_back();
        return val;
    }

private:
    std::recursive_mutex _queueLock;
    std::condition_variable_any _queueCond;
    std::list<T> _queue;
    bool _started = false;
};

template<class T, class U>
class actor
{
public:
    actor() :
        _started( false ),
        _thread(),
        _queue()
    {
    }

    actor( const actor& ) = delete;

    virtual ~actor() noexcept
    {
        if( _started )
            stop();
    }

    actor& operator = ( const actor& ) = delete;

    void start()
    {
        _started = true;

        _queue.start();

        _thread = std::thread( &actor<T,U>::_entry_point, this );
    }

    void stop()
    {
        _started = false;

        _queue.stop();

        _thread.join();
    }

    std::future<U> post( const T& cmd )
    {
        std::promise<U> p;
        std::future<U> waiter = p.get_future();

        _queue.post_front( std::pair<T,std::promise<U>>(cmd, std::move(p)) );

        return waiter;
    }

    virtual U process( const T& cmd ) = 0;

protected:
    void _entry_point()
    {
        while( _started )
        {
            _queue.wait();

            if( !_started )
                continue;

            std::pair<T,std::promise<U>> item = _queue.pop_back();

            item.second.set_value( process( item.first ) );
        }
    }

    bool _started;
    std::thread _thread;
    command_queue<std::pair<T,std::promise<U>>> _queue;
};

class int_printer : public actor<int,bool>
{
public:
    virtual bool process( const int& cmd ) override
    {
        printf("%d",cmd);
        return true;
    }
};

using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
//    std::promise<bool> p;
//    list<std::pair<int,std::promise<bool>>> promises;
//    promises.push_back( make_pair<int,std::promise<bool>>(10,std::move(p)) );

    int_printer a;
    a.start();
    future<bool> result = a.post( 10 );
    a.stop();
}

[developer@0800275b874e projects]$ g++ -std=c++11 pf.cpp -opf -lpthread
pf.cpp: In instantiation of ‘T command_queue<T>::pop_back() [with T = std::pair<int, std::promise<bool> >]’:
pf.cpp:133:65:   required from ‘void actor<T, U>::_entry_point() [with T = int; U = bool]’
pf.cpp:99:9:   required from ‘void actor<T, U>::start() [with T = int; U = bool]’
pf.cpp:163:13:   required from here
pf.cpp:60:32: error: use of deleted function ‘constexpr std::pair<_T1, _T2>::pair(const std::pair<_T1, _T2>&) [with _T1 = int; _T2 = std::promise<bool>]’
In file included from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/utility:72:0,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/tuple:38,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/mutex:39,
                 from pf.cpp:2:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/bits/stl_pair.h:119:17: note: ‘constexpr std::pair<_T1, _T2>::pair(const std::pair<_T1, _T2>&) [with _T1 = int; _T2 = std::promise<bool>]’ is implicitly deleted because the default definition would be ill-formed:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/bits/stl_pair.h:119:17: error: use of deleted function ‘std::promise<_Res>::promise(const std::promise<_Res>&) [with _Res = bool]’
In file included from pf.cpp:4:0:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/future:963:7: error: declared here
In file included from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.0/../../../../include/c++/4.7.0/list:64:0,
                 from pf.cpp:5:
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Promises aren't copyable (which makes sense - they represent a unique state). You need to use std::move in several places to transfer the unique ownership of the promise along.

Specifically, your home-brew queue class needs to permit moving, e.g.

auto val = std::move(_queue.back());
_queue.pop_back();
return val;
share|improve this answer
    
I am using std::move in post()... I tried using std::move around pop_back(), but it had no effect. – dicroce Feb 1 '14 at 16:20
    
@dicroce: You need auto val = std::move(_queue.back()) etc. – Kerrek SB Feb 1 '14 at 16:23
    
Implementing back() is a problem because the queue operations need to be atomic with respect to the queue because the locking is internal.. Maybe I just can't split the functionality between these classes in this way... – dicroce Feb 1 '14 at 18:00
    
@dicroce: The operation is protected by the mutex, isn't it? That looks safe. – Kerrek SB Feb 1 '14 at 19:47
    
command_queue.back() returns a reference, but the lock in command_queue.back() would only protect the queue while IN back(). I ended up implementing actor with its own queue, mutex and condition variable (as opposed to using a command_queue instance) as this allowed me to use queue.back() safely. You're answer put me on the right track however, so I'm gonna accept this as a solution. – dicroce Feb 2 '14 at 17:50

You protect writes to command_queue::_started with _queueLock, but not the read in command_queue::started(); this is a data race if some thread can call started while another thread is performing a modification (e.g., stop()).

Several small observations:

  • It doesn't make your program incorrect, but it's better to notify a condition variable outside the mutex. If you notify with the mutex held, another core may waste a microsecond or two scheduling a waiting thread to run only to immediately block on the mutex.

  • Your post_front(T&&) is copying the passed item into the queue due to missing a std::move:

    _queue.push_front( cmd );
    

    must be

    _queue.push_front( std::move( cmd ) );
    

    if you want it to actually be moved into the queue.

  • The predicate for the condition variable wait could be simplified from

    [this](){return !this->_queue.empty() ? true : !this->_started;}
    

    to

    [this]{return !_queue.empty() || !_started;}
    
  • None of the command_queue member functions call other command_queue functions, so you could use a plain std::mutex instead of std::recursive_mutex and std::condition_variable instead of std::condition_variable_any.

  • You could use std::lock_guard<std::mutex> instead of std::unique_lock<std::mutex> to lock the mutex in every member function except wait. It's ever-so-slightly lighter weight.

  • You have the traditional pop exception-safety issue: If the selected move/copy constructor for T fails with an exception when returning from pop_back after modifying the queue, that element is lost. The way you've written the function makes this occurrence extremely unlikely, since

    auto val = _queue.back();
    _queue.pop_back();
    return val;
    

    (or after Kerrek's fix)

    auto val = std::move(_queue.back());
    _queue.pop_back();
    return val;
    

    should qualify for copy elision with a decent compiler, constructing the returned object in-place before the pop_back happens. Just be aware that if future changes impede copy elision you'll introduce the exception safety problem. You can avoid the issue altogether by passing a T& or optional<T>& as a parameter and move assigning the result to that parameter.

  • actor::_started is unnecessary since it's effectively a proxy for actor::_queue::_started.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe that adding a lock to started() would be fairly pointless. First of all, reading that member is going to be atomic (on every architecture I am aware of, and certainly all of the ones I care about). Second, there is a gap between a lock in a function scope getting cleaned up (and hence unlocking) and the caller actually receiving the return value, so even with the lock, the return value could be stale. This function is safe this way because it does not mutate the state of the object, and all methods that do so ARE protected by locks. – dicroce Feb 2 '14 at 16:38
    
@dicroce You are obviously the final arbiter of what is or is not acceptable in your program, but I personally would not characterize a function with undefined behavior as "safe": it has a tendency to break when moving to a new system or compiler release. – Casey Feb 2 '14 at 17:17
    
I am going to take your advice with regard to the non recursive mutexes, however. I think it was just force of habit that caused me to use recursive one (a library I've been using for years only has recursive mutexes). – dicroce Feb 2 '14 at 17:35
    
I was actually very surprised that C++11 allowed notify_one() without the lock held (again, the lib i've been using required it). By holding the lock when you call notify_one() you keep the waiting thread blocked in wait() until you release the lock (as wait() must reacquire the lock when it returns). This gives you a chance to make multiple changes to the predicate state in an atomic fashion from the viewpoint of the waiting thread. So, it's not entirely pointless, though in this particular case it is. Force of habit strikes again! I will probably make the change you recommend. – dicroce Feb 2 '14 at 17:46

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