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The following seem the same to me but they give different result:

$ perl -e '  
my $pop = 298444215;  
$pop =~ s/(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+$)/,/g;   
print $pop,"\n"'  
298,444,215  

$ perl -e '  
my $pop = 298444215;  
$pop =~ s/(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+)/,/g;  
print $pop,"\n"'  
2,9,8,4,4,4,215  

What I was expecting as a result was the first (place a comma in the proper place of the number).
But why is the result so different by just adding/removing the $?

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The question boils down to "Why is a comma added after the '2' in one case but not the other?" Knowing this, it's easy to see the difference. Just try to see how the patterns match starting at that position. –  ikegami Feb 2 '14 at 5:04

3 Answers 3

The $ ensures that there are digits in triples up ahead the position where there is a match.

So that the matches will only be at those positions (spaces inserted for clarification):

        3     3
      v---v v---v
2 9 8 4 4 4 2 1 5
     ^     ^

The other positions do not match since there are no digits in sets of 3 till the end.

E.g. Here it doesn't match:

    3     3    2
  v---v v---v
2 9 8 4 4 4 2 1 5
 ^

Because there are 2 sets of 3 and then it cannot match the end of line, or another set of 3 digits.

But without the $, the lookahead matches at more positions:

2 9 8 4 4 4 2 1 5
 ^

Here, the lookbehind is satisfied, and so does the lookahead because there is at least one group of 3 digits ahead, being:

2 9 8 4 4 4 2 1 5
  ^---^

And the lookahead is satisfied here and doesn't need to match more than that.

This of course means that every other position that follows will also match, until the match is almost at the end:

2 9 8 4 4 4 2 1 5
             ^

Here, it cannot match since there are only 2 digits ahead.

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It is as if you imply that 5 and 5$ are different here.I am not really clear on why that is –  Jim Feb 1 '14 at 20:17
1  
@Jim It depends on the situation, but 5 and 5$ are different. /5/g will match all the 5s in 5555 but /5$/g will match only the last 5 in 5555. –  Jerry Feb 1 '14 at 20:18
    
@Jim Maybe these debugger will help: with $; without $. You can click on the + handles to get a peek at how the matching is working. –  Jerry Feb 1 '14 at 20:30

Your first example matches anything that has multiples of three digits as the last thing in the line of input whereas your second example matches anything that has multiples of three digits, but not necessarily all the way to the end.

To clarify, At the point between the 2 and the 98444215 in the string, there is a match for 984 442 following in your second example, but since your first example, the blocks of three digits must immediately be followed by the end of line, there is no match.

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You need to count groups of three from the end of the string in order to insert the commas properly.

The first pattern says to find any number of groups of 3 with a digit before them and ending at the end of the string, then insert a comma there. It does this until it can't do it anymore because of the g flag. It actually performs the insertions from the start of the string onwards. So the sequence of insertions is

298,444215
298,444,215

The second pattern says to find any number of groups of 3 with a digit before them, but the groups of 3 don't have to end at the end of the string. So it inserts the commas in this sequence:

2,98444215
2,9,8444215
2,9,8,444215
2,9,8,4,44215
2,9,8,4,4,4215
2,9,8,4,4,4,215
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