Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to read a web page via WinHTTP:

bool WinHTTPClass::QueryResponseData(std::string &query_data)
{
    // Read response

    DWORD dwSize, dwDownloaded = 0;

    do 
    {
        // Check for available data.  

        if( !WinHttpQueryDataAvailable( hRequest, &dwSize ) )
        {
            cout << "Error querying data : " << GetLastError() << endl;
            return false;
        }

        // Allocate space for the buffer.

        char* pszOutBuffer = new char[dwSize+1];

        if( !pszOutBuffer )
        {
            cout << "Out of memory" << endl;
            dwSize=0;
        }
        else
        {
            // Read the data.
            ZeroMemory( pszOutBuffer, dwSize+1 );

            if( !WinHttpReadData( hRequest, (LPVOID)pszOutBuffer, 
                                dwSize, &dwDownloaded ) )
            {
                cout << "Error reading data : " << GetLastError() << endl;
                return false;
            }
            else
            {
                query_data += pszOutBuffer;
            }

            // Free the memory allocated to the buffer.
            delete [] pszOutBuffer;
        }
    }
    while( dwSize > 0 );

    return true;
}

All this works well. The confusion I am having here is that should I handle the buffer data using unicode encoding buffer instead of:

char* pszOutBuffer = new char[dwSize+1];

By such as using wchar_t instead the web pages commonly use UTF8? What's the difference? Where am I confused?

share|improve this question

HTTP is a binary transport, it has no concept of text or Unicode. HTTP uses 7bit ASCII for HTTP headers, but content is arbitrary binary data whose interpretation is dependent on the HTTP headers that describe it, most notably the Content-Type header. So you need to receive the raw content data into your char[] buffer first, then look at the received Content-Type header using WinHttpQueryHeaders() to see what kind of data you received. If it says you received a text/... type then the header will usually also specify the charset of the text. In the case of text/html, the charset may be in a <meta> tag within the HTML itself instead of in the HTTP header. Once you know the charset of the text, you can then convert it to wchar_t[] using MultiByteToWideChar() (you will have to manually lookup the appropriate codepage for the charset).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.