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I read that in Haskell, you could create a sequence like this: [1,3..9] I wrote a version in Clojure, and though I liked programming without state, the time complexity is huge. Can I speed up my code without having to maintain state? How?

Edit: If you're interested in understanding the solution, you can read my blog post.

Use cases:

(infer-n [1 2] 10)     => [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10]
(infer-n [1 4 9] 10)   => [1 4 9 16 25 ... 100]
(infer-range [9 7] 1)  => [9 7 5 3 1]

Code:

(defn diffs
  "(diffs [1 2 5 12 29]) => (1 3 7 17)" 
  [alist]
  (map - (rest alist) alist))

(defn const-diff
  "Returns the diff if it is constant for the seq, else nil.
   Non-strict version." 
  [alist]
  (let [ds (diffs alist)
        curr (first ds)]
    (if (some #(not (= curr %)) ds)
      nil
      curr)))

(defn get-next
  "Returns the next item in the list according to the
   method of differences.
   (get-next [2 4]) => 6"
  [alist]
  (+ (last alist)
     (let [d (const-diff alist)]
       (if (= nil d)
         (get-next (diffs alist))
         d))))

(defn states-of
  "Returns an infinite sequence of states that the
   input sequence can have.
  (states-of [1 3]) => ([1 3]
                        [1 3 5]
                        [1 3 5 7]
                        [1 3 5 7 9]...)"
  [first-state]
  (iterate #(conj % (get-next %)) first-state))

(defn infer-n
  "Returns the first n items from the inferred-list.
   (infer-n [1 4 9] 10) => [1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100]" 
  [alist n]
  (take n (map first (states-of alist))))

(defn infer-range
  "(infer-range [10 9] 1) => [10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1]" 
  [alist bound]
  (let [in-range (if (>= bound (last alist))
                    #(<= % bound)
                    #(>= % bound))]
    (last (for [l (states-of alist) :while (in-range (last l))] l))))
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2  
The big performance hit in this code is not from the statelessness, but from building a large collection of collections for each step, instead of taking subsequences of one collection. Thanks to statelessness and laziness we can simplify this and speed it up and make it take up less heap space. –  noisesmith Feb 1 at 23:44
1  
It's impossible to write a function to infer the infinite list of squares from a list of three elements. You need a human brain for that, or something of the sort. –  omiel Feb 2 at 1:11
    
I mean, you can make a solution that would get the polynomial sequence of least degree whose first terms match the input. This at least is possible ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrange_polynomial ). But you can't come with further requirements beyond that point. Do you expect [1 2 4 8 16 ...] to be inferred from [1 2 4] ? –  omiel Feb 2 at 1:20
    
@omiel [1 2 4] would generate (1 2 4 7 11 16 22). Since the first differences between consecutive elements is (1 2) and the difference between 1 and 2 is a constant 1, it would be inferred that those first differences continue as (1 2 3 4 ...). The squares so happen to be the cumulative sum of odd integers. The powers of 2, on the other hand are not inferable using this method. –  A. Webb Feb 2 at 3:37
1  
@omiel Yes, we are saying the same thing. The question's title itself specifies the method of differences to continue the sequence from a finite number of initial elements. Therefore, polynomials are indeed what will be produced. –  A. Webb Feb 2 at 19:20
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Helper

(defn diff [s] (map - (rest s) s))

Infer sequence based on method of finite differences

(defn infer-diff [s]
  (->> (take (count s) (iterate diff s)) 
       (map last) reverse 
       (drop-while zero?) ;optional 
       (iterate (partial reductions +))
       (map last) rest 
       (concat s)))

Examples

(take 10 (infer-diff [1 3]))
;=> (1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19)

(take 10 (infer-diff [1 4 9]))
;=> (1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100)

Explanation

(def s (list 1 4 9))

(take (count s) (iterate diff s))
;=> ((1 4 9)
;    ( 3 5 )
;    (  2  ))

(map last *1)
;=> (9 5 2)

(reverse *1)
;=> (2 5 9)

This (2 5 9) slice of the pyramid of successive first differences is all you need to determine the rest of the sequence.

(reductions + *1)
;=> (2 7 16) and the next in the sequence is at the end: 16

(reductions + *1)
;=> (2 9 25) and the next in the sequence is at the end: 25

(reductions + *1)
;=> (2 11 36) and the next in the sequence is at the end: 36
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is exactly what I was looking for. –  divs1210 Feb 2 at 7:48
    
How is (partial (reductions +)) different from #(reductions + %)? –  divs1210 Feb 2 at 12:12
    
I now realize that (take (count pattern) (iterate diffs pattern)) was what I should've been looking for. –  divs1210 Feb 2 at 15:50
    
@divs Both (partial reductions +) [note no inner parentheses] and #(reductions + %) will do the same thing here. The first would accept a variable number of additional arguments and the second would accept a single argument. Here we are only feeding in one, so either would work. –  A. Webb Feb 2 at 19:25
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With const-diff? defined, iterate and take already give us nearly everything we need here.

A note: since const-diff? does not return a boolean value, it probably should not have a ? in the name.

 (defn interpolate [pattern]
  (when-let [step (const-diff? pattern)]
    (iterate #(+ step %) (first pattern))))

(defn bounded-interpolate [pattern bound]
  (let [cmp (if (> bound (first pattern)) > <)
        past #(cmp % bound)]
    (take-while (comp not past)
                (interpolate pattern))))

iterate is already lazy, so we don't need to build some other lazy-sequence-like semantics on top of it, and it already uses structural sharing on top of it, so the cost should not be too extreme (and we don't need to build a sequence of sequences to make it store the intermediate useful results - it shares the substructure when applicable automatically).

user> (bounded-interpolate [1 3 5] 21)
(1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21)

user> (take 100 (interpolate [1 3 5]))
(1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 101 103 105 107 109 111 113 115 117 119 121 123 125 127 129 131 133 135 137 139 141 143 145 147 149 151 153 155 157 159 161 163 165 167 169 171 173 175 177 179 181 183 185 187 189 191 193 195 197 199)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but your solution doesn't seem to work for more complex patterns. I want (1,4,9...100) to return (1 4 9 16 25 .. 100). –  divs1210 Feb 2 at 0:39
    
That's a much different question I think, and AFAIK one that no other language addresses. Would you be looking for a dictionary of hard coded integer sequences? DSP based signal extrapolation / interpolation? Polynomial curve fitting? –  noisesmith Feb 2 at 1:54
    
removed the ? from const-diff?. –  divs1210 Feb 2 at 9:05
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