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Trying to return a list with the last element removed. Why am I getting this error?

ERROR file:.\ShrinkByOne.hs:5 - Type error in application
*** Expression     : (lis !! n : result) lis n
*** Term           : (:)
*** Type           : f -> [f] -> [f]
*** Does not match : a -> b -> c -> d -> e

shrinkByOne :: [Int]  -> [Int]  -> Int ->  [Int]
shrinkByOne result lis n
    | n <= ((length lis) - 2) = shrinkByOne ( ((lis !! n):result) lis n+1) -- this condition prevents the last element from being returned
    | otherwise = result
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why the error?

In your original code, you had something like that:

shrinkByOne (... something ...)

which meant that you applied only one argument to shrinkByOne. You need this instead:

shrinkByOne (... something ...) (... something ...) (... something ...)

Therefore, put parentheses this way:

shrinkByOne :: [Int]  -> [Int]  -> Int ->  [Int]
shrinkByOne result lis n
    | n <= ((length lis) - 2) = shrinkByOne ((lis !! n):result) lis (n+1) -- this condition prevents the last element from being returned
    | otherwise = result

Other remarks

However, you will still not get the desired result, as the result will be reversed and the !! is expensive, and your function will be of Θ(n²) complexity.

Try a much simpler, linear approach:

shrinkByOne' :: [Int] -> [Int]
shrinkByOne' [x] = []
shrinkByOne' (x : xs) = x : shrinkByOne' xs

Finally, I understand that this is an exercise to learn Haskell. If it's not, simply use the init function from the Prelude.

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+1 for pointing out the more fundamental problems with the OP's approach. –  leftaroundabout Feb 2 at 0:27

First, you want to leave out unneeded parens around function arguments. f(x) is written f x in Haskell (that one's just optional), and in particular you can't write g (x y) if g :: A -> B -> C, it needs to be g x y (or possibly g (x) (y). But g (x y) would mean, you apply the function x to the argument y, and use the result as argument for g. (If you actually want that, write g $ x y, or g . x $ y.)

So that would mean shrinkByOne ((lis !! n):result) lis n+1. Which would, however, be parsed as (shrinkByOne ((lis !! n):result) lis n) + 1: infix operators like + always have lower precedence than function application, so indeed around n+1 you do need parens.

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