Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two classes, ThisTest and SimpleTime. The method buildString() returns a concatenated string with the "this" keyword. When I run it, "this" seems to refer to the method toString() and not the class SimpleTime. Why does the toString() method execute when I use the "this" keyword? Thanks.

import java.text.DecimalFormat;

import javax.swing.*;

public class ThisTest {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        SimpleTime time = new SimpleTime( 12, 30, 19 );

        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null, time.buildString(), 
       "Demonstrating the \"this\" Reference", JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);

        System.exit(0);
    }
}

class SimpleTime {
    private int hour, minute, second;

    public SimpleTime( int hour, int minute, int second )
    {
        this.hour = hour;
        this.minute = minute;
        this.second = second;
    }

    public String buildString()
    {
        return "this.toString(): " + this.toString() + 
        "\ntoString(): " + toString() + 
        "\nthis (with implicit toString() call): " + this;
    }
    public String toString()
    {
        DecimalFormat twoDigits = new DecimalFormat("00");

        //"this" not required, because toString does not have
        //local variables with same names as instance variables
        return twoDigits.format( this.hour ) + ":" +
        twoDigits.format( this.minute ) + ":" +
        twoDigits.format( this.second );
    }

    public String anotherString()
    {
        return "Another String for you";
    }

}

share|improve this question
    
Do you know what this is? Do you know about String concatenation? – Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 2 '14 at 0:31
    
What were you expecting to happen? – JLRishe Feb 2 '14 at 0:36
    
I understand what String concatenation does and what "this" is, but I didn't understand why toString was being called when I used "this". – inventorbc Feb 2 '14 at 0:37
    
I didn't know what to expect really – inventorbc Feb 2 '14 at 0:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because that's what happens when you use the String concatenation operator (+).

It calls the toString() method of the object being added (which is guanateed to be there since it's defined in Object).

In your case, that's the current object (this) so you get this.toString() called. And because you've overriden toString() in your class, you get the result of that.

Edit to add: Note that there's no difference between + this and + this.toString(); you'll end up with the same result.

Specifically, this is covered by section 15.18.1 of the JLS

If only one operand expression is of type String, then string conversion (§5.1.11) is performed on the other operand to produce a string at run time.

And §5.1.11 states:

...

Now only reference values need to be considered:

If the reference is null, it is converted to the string "null" (four ASCII characters n, u, l, l).

Otherwise, the conversion is performed as if by an invocation of the toString method of the referenced object with no arguments; but if the result of invoking the toString method is null, then the string "null" is used instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it makes sense. What would happen if I didn't have a toString() method in the class? – inventorbc Feb 2 '14 at 0:45
    
@inventorbc If you don't override toString() you get the default implementation from Object which outputs a combination of the hashcode and class name. – Brian Roach Feb 2 '14 at 0:46
    
Oh so thats what that is... I kept getting SimpleTime@22c73b when I took out the toString() method. Thanks man! – inventorbc Feb 2 '14 at 1:02

This has nothing to do with this.
When used with strings, Java's + operator will implicitly call toString() on any non-string operand.

This is how expressions like "A" + 1 compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Incorrect. And primitives don't have a toString() method. – Bohemian Feb 2 '14 at 0:32
    
@Bohemian: They're auto-boxed first. – SLaks Feb 2 '14 at 0:43
    
No they're not autoboxed. StringBuilder's append(int) is called, and that calls AbstractStringBuilder's append(int) method, and that calls Integer.getChars() and that does the String building the hard way. No autoboxing anywhere. – Bohemian Feb 2 '14 at 0:46
    
@Bohemian Not according to 5.1.11 of the the spec – Brian Roach Feb 2 '14 at 0:52
    
Though in the case of two literals the compiler actually just deals with it and the result is stored in the constant_pool in the .class file (at least in java 7) – Brian Roach Feb 2 '14 at 0:56

in this line:

 "\nthis (with implicit toString() call): " + this;

The operator '+' works with two strings, java implicitly call to the toString() method to obtain the string representation of the object referenced by this. write "this" or "this.toString()" is totally equivalent.

share|improve this answer

The expression

String s = "literal" + object;

compiles to

String s = new StringBuilder().append( "literal" ).append( object ).toString();

If we have a look at the source code for StringBuilder#append(Object), we find:

public StringBuilder append(Object obj) {
    return append(String.valueOf(obj));
}

If we have a look at the source code for String.valueOf(Object), we find:

public static String valueOf(Object obj) {
    return (obj == null) ? "null" : obj.toString();
}

So ultimately, the object's toString() method is called.

Blatantly plagiarising from DavidWallace's comment:

Section 15.18.1 states

... If only one operand expression is of type String, then string conversion (§5.1.11) is performed on the other operand to produce a string at run time. ...

and section 5.1.11 states

... the conversion is performed as if by an invocation of the toString() method of the referenced object with no arguments; but if the result of invoking the toString() method is null, then the string "null" is used instead. ...

So it seems the current JDK doesn't directly adhere to the JLS, but it gets there in the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Your last sentence is false. It is absolutely part of the JLS that this happens. Section 15.18.1 states "... If only one operand expression is of type String, then string conversion (§5.1.11) is performed on the other operand to produce a string at run time. ..." and section 5.1.11 states - "... the conversion is performed as if by an invocation of the toString method of the referenced object with no arguments; but if the result of invoking the toString method is null, then the string "null" is used instead. ..." – David Wallace Feb 2 '14 at 0:54
1  
Hmm. I wish I'd bothered to read Brian Roach's answer before I went and found those two excerpts for myself. :-( – David Wallace Feb 2 '14 at 1:19
    
@DavidWallace Interesting. Bad Oracle for not following the JLS. I'll put a note in the answer. – Bohemian Feb 2 '14 at 1:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.