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I have a function that reads a file from a server and returns the data:

int readMessageFromServer(int fileDescriptor) {
  char buffer[MAXMSG];
  int nOfBytes;

  nOfBytes = read(fileDescriptor, buffer, MAXMSG);
  if(nOfBytes < 0) {
    perror("Could not read data from server\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  else
    if(nOfBytes == 0) 
      return(-1);
    else 
      printf("Server Message: %s\n",  buffer);
  return(0);
}

The problem is with the line

printf("Server Message: %s\n",  buffer);

If I change this line to

printf("Server Message: %s\n>",  buffer);

It refuses to print the '>' sign until it gets more data.

Is this a known limitation or am I doing something wrong?

I should probably add that the call to this function looks like this:

while(readMessageFromServer(sock) > 0) {continue;};
share|improve this question
    
It is probably printf("Server Message: %s\n>", buffer) with the > sign inside the quotes? –  Kurt Pattyn Feb 2 at 0:34
    
The > is inside the quotes if that's what you mean. –  user3255596 Feb 2 at 0:35
    
Corrected the question –  Kurt Pattyn Feb 2 at 0:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

printf uses stdout which is a buffered output.
Changing printf with fprintf(stderr, ...) should solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked. –  user3255596 Feb 2 at 0:49
    
You could also use fflush(stdout); or even fflush(0); with standard output. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 at 6:09

Besides the fact that you probably wanted to write the > inside the quotes, you'll need to flush the output buffer by calling fflush(stdout). The buffers are usually only flushed after newlines.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think stderr is buffered. –  chux Feb 2 at 4:50

nOfBytes = read(fileDescriptor, buffer, MAXMSG);

There is no guarantee how many bytes you read or whether they constitute a null terminated string. At a minimum you should change to something like this:

int readMessageFromServer(int fileDescriptor) {
  char buffer[MAXMSG];
  int nOfBytes;

  nOfBytes = read(fileDescriptor, buffer, MAXMSG - 1);
  if(nOfBytes < 0) {
    perror("Could not read data from server\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  else
    if(nOfBytes == 0) 
      return(-1);
    else 
    {
      buffer[nOfBytes] = '\0';
      printf("Server Message: %s\n",  buffer);
      return(0);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't the null character tell the read function to stop reading? Where would I put this command? –  user3255596 Feb 2 at 0:53
1  
No. You are reading a stream and read can return any number of characters up to the number you request. It puts those bytes into a buffer. It would be luck if the character in the buffer following the number of bytes you read was a null and therefore created a proper C-string for you to fprint. Note that you only need to do this in this case because you are trying to print each read into buffer as a string. –  Duck Feb 2 at 0:58
    
+1 for the buffer[nOfBytes] = '\0'; –  chux Feb 2 at 4:51

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