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I only really need the HBox answer but figure that if we get a good answer in here it would help anyone trying to do a similar thing with a VBox. It would be nice to know this in both actionscript and MXML.

So I have an HBox that I want some text aligned from the left and some radios from the right. Like so:

 ___________________________________________________
|                                                   |
|Text                                Yes ()  No()   |
|___________________________________________________|

I am currently doing this by having an invisible box with a width of 100% between the text and the radios, like this

 _____ __________________________________ ________________
|     |                                  |                |
|Text | invisible box  percentWidth=100; | Yes ()  No()   |
|_____|__________________________________|________________|

I would prefer to just have the radios in their own HBox that is right aligned like this:

 _____ ________________________________________________________
|     |                                                        |
|Text |                                         Yes ()  No()   |
|_____|________________________________________________________|

I've seen some posts talk about a horizontalAlign property, but I don't see it in the documentation anywhere.

So how can I accomplish this?

Thanks ~mike

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There is a horizontalAlign property, and a verticalAlign property, on the VBox and HBox components (it's inherited from Box). They determine the horizontal and vertical alignment of the component's children.

I generally use the Spacer object, like Sam mentions. But for what you want to do, this will work great.

In MXML you could do something like:

<mx:RadioButtonGroup id="yesNoRadioGroup"/>

<mx:HBox id="containingHBox" width="100%">
    <mx:Text id="textElement" width="200" text="lakdfa lkadslkjraklnd kadflk lakdsjlkja lksdlkjdflk jalkdlkjdfslksajdf lkjasdflkjdsalkjds lksdjlkj"/>
    <mx:HBox id="rightAlignedHorizontalContent" width="100%" horizontalAlign="right">
        <mx:RadioButton id="yesRadio" label="Yes" groupName="yesNoRadioGroup"/>
        <mx:RadioButton id="noRadio" label="No" groupName ="yesNoRadioGroup"/>
    </mx:HBox>
</mx:HBox>

Note that the HBox with the horizontalAlign set has to have a width value, otherwise, it will only be wide enough to accommodate the width of its children, in which case alignment is moot.

Here's an AS version:

<mx:Script>
    <![CDATA[
        import mx.controls.RadioButton;
        import mx.controls.RadioButtonGroup;
        import mx.controls.Text;

        private var containingHBox:HBox;
        private var textElement:Text;
        private var rightAlignedHorizontalContent:HBox;
        private var yesNoRadioGroup:RadioButtonGroup; 
        private var yesRadio:RadioButton;
        private var noRadio:RadioButton;

        override protected function createChildren():void
        {
            super.createChildren();

            containingHBox = new HBox();
            containingHBox.percentWidth = 100;

            textElement = new Text();
            textElement.width = 200;
            textElement.text = "lakdfa lkadslkjraklnd kadflk lakdsjlkja lksdlkjdflk jalkdlkjdfslksajdf lkjasdflkjdsalkjds lksdjlkj";

            rightAlignedHorizontalContent = new HBox();
            rightAlignedHorizontalContent.percentWidth = 100;
            rightAlignedHorizontalContent.setStyle("horizontalAlign","right");

            yesNoRadioGroup = new RadioButtonGroup();

            yesRadio = new RadioButton();
            yesRadio.label = "Yes";
            yesRadio.groupName = "yesNoRadioGroup";

            noRadio = new RadioButton();
            noRadio.label = "No";
            noRadio.groupName = "yesNoRadioGroup";


            addChild(containingHBox);

            containingHBox.addChild(textElement);
            containingHBox.addChild(rightAlignedHorizontalContent);

            rightAlignedHorizontalContent.addChild(yesRadio);
            rightAlignedHorizontalContent.addChild(noRadio);
        }
    ]]>
</mx:Script>
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DOH! it's a style, I kept looking for horizontalAlign in properties. so the AS way would be to do a setStyle("horizontalAlign","right"); –  invertedSpear Jan 27 '10 at 23:39
2  
+1 for spelling out that the HBox requires a width. For something so obvious I was a long way from discovering it myself. –  susichan Feb 3 '10 at 12:32

If you're already using HBox/VBox for your layout, then using Spacer is the right way to go to move certain items all the way over to the right/bottom.

An alternative is constraint based layout. This is good when you want to anchor content to the left, you use a canvas as the parent and on the child set "right='0'" to position it all the way to the right. This is less ideal when you are stacking multiple items based on their size. You could use a binding, "right='{noComponent.width}" to put Yes just to the right of No.

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+1 <mx:Spacer width="100%"/> is the way to go. –  Amarghosh Jan 28 '10 at 4:26
    
Why do you feel that using a Spacer is the right way to go? It seems to me that your adding another child object when you don't need to be and that just aligning the HBox to the right will require less memory/processing, especially when I'm looking at repeating this possibly hundreds of times. I'm still rather new to Flex, so I may be totally off in my logic. –  invertedSpear Jan 28 '10 at 16:51
    
@invertedSpear, if Text, Yes, and No are all inside the same HBox, then using a Spacer will be the most efficient way. The framework is already running through the logic to position Text, Yes, and No. Positioning one more Spacer in the middle is trivial. In general you want to look for the solution that works best within your existing project and expresses your intent best, and worry about micro-level performance when quantitative measurements show you need optimization. –  Samuel Neff Jan 28 '10 at 17:20

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