Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I wanted to figure out what the syscalls behind GetWindowText are. I wrote a simple program to call GetWindowText with a handle to a window in a different process.

int CALLBACK WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(0,"Attach debugger and set bp","on GetWindowTextA",0);

    HWND winmine = FindWindow(NULL,"Minesweeper");

    if(winmine != NULL)
    {
        char buf[255] = "";
        GetWindowTextA(winmine, buf, 254);
        MessageBox(0,buf,"Found",0);
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox(0,"?","Found nothing",0);
    }

    return 0;
}

I attached a debugger and stepped through the GetWindowTextA call, manually stepping through everything except these API calls (in order):

  • GetWindowThreadProcessId (in GetWindowLong)
  • InterlockedIncrement
  • WCSToMBEx (which is basically WideCharToMultiByte)
  • InterlockedDecrement

None of these API calls seem to be able to read a string in memory not owned by the calling process. I used a usermode debugger so I certainly didn't end up in kernelmode while stepping without realizing it. This means that GetWindowText got the window name without performing a context switch. Which seems to imply that the text for every window that exists is accessible without a context switch.. and that can't be right because there's no way Windows keeps a copy of the text for every single window/control on the system, on every single process.

I have read this article. It mentions that window names are stored in quote "a special place", but does not explain how this "special place" can be accessed from a different process without a syscall/context switching.

So I'm looking for any explanations as to how this is done. Any information you can provide is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
Believe it or not, but this info is stored in memory that is shared between all the processes that use user32.dll. You may try to search virtual space of your process for unicode names of other processes' windows. –  qwm Feb 2 '14 at 9:06
    
@qwm Thank you, this was very illuminating. I tried what you suggested and sure enough the names of all windows including controls are stored in a MEM_MAPPED section. On a side note, it seems that the text for EDITTEXT controls are not stored in this manner. –  higaki Feb 2 '14 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

GetWindowText got the window name without performing a context switch. Which seems to imply that the text for every window that exists is accessible without a context switch.

This info is stored in memory that is shared between all the processes that use user32.dll. You may try to search virtual space of your process for unicode names of other processes' windows.

It gets mapped into the process address space during user32.dll loading. There are some kernel structures/sections involved: win32k!gSharedInfo, win32k!ghSectionShared, win32k!gpsi and others (which I don't know of).

Actually, the lower 16 bits of HWND represents index into window info array with base address *(&user32!gSharedInfo + 1). The first field of this window info is the kernel address of another structure which contains all the shared window information. Subtracting the difference between kernel address of the section and its user-space mapping (which is stored in TEB!Win32ClientInfo) you can get relevant info.

user32!ValidateHwnd is the function that converts window handle into this address which can be used by inner user32 functions like user32!DefWindowProcWorker.

Pseudocode of GetWindowTextW looks like (excluding error-handling):

    GetWindowTextW(HWND hwnd, wchar_t* buf, int size)
    {
        inner_hwnd = ValidateHwnd(hwnd);
        if (TestWindowProcess(inner_hwnd))
            SendMessageWorker(inner_hwnd, WM_GETTEXT, size, buf, FALSE);
        else
            DefWindowProcWorker(inner_hwnd, WM_GETTEXT, size, buf, FALSE);
    }

DefWindowProcWorker which is called in your case with WM_GETTEXT will just parse the structure referenced by inner_hwnd and copy window's name into buf.


it seems that the text for EDITTEXT controls are not stored in this manner

I never knew all the info that was stored in there though it seems like a good choice to not pollute processes' virtual space with all kinds of user/gdi params. Besides, lower integrity processes should not be able to get higher integrity processes sensitive information.

share|improve this answer

because there's no way Windows keeps a copy of the text for every single window

The text most certainly exists, just not as a copy. The text for a window is stored in the virtual memory of the process that owns the window. Might be in RAM, not terribly likely if the process has been dormant for a while, definitely on disk in the paging file. Which doesn't stop GetWindowText() from making a copy. On-the-fly, when you call it.

GetWindowText() is limited, it is documented to only being capable of copying the caption text of a window, so it probably uses the desktop heap for the session to retrieve the text. Not otherwise a restriction to a winapi function like SendMessage(), you can use WM_GETTEXT to obtain a gigabyte from an Edit control. That certainly crosses the process boundary.

As an operating system function, SendMessage can of course break all the rules that apply to normal processes. The OS has no trouble addressing the VM of an arbitrary process. Rules that are routinely broken, your debugger does it as well. With functions that you can use to also break the rules, ReadProcessMemory() and WriteProcessMemory().

share|improve this answer
2  
Did you read the comment to the question and try to verify whether it was true or not? It might have saved you from posting an inaccurate answer. Furthermore, there's nothing special about operating system functions. User-mode code is restricted by the MMU/MPU no matter what library it comes from. Privileged access to other processes requires a syscall. –  Ben Voigt Feb 3 '14 at 14:58
    
Oh, it is you again. Always ready to post a derogatory comment. It will be a bright day indeed if I ever see something other than a sneer from you. Do feel free to just downvote without the ridicule, please. If it is stored in shared memory then it is still mapped in the virtual memory of the owning process. And of course GetWindowText() copies it. WM_GETTEXT doesn't have any trouble copying a jiggabyte out of an edit control. –  Hans Passant Feb 3 '14 at 17:33
    
Pot, kettle. I see you often leaving more rude comments on other people's answers without even the advantage of being correct. Anyway, are you going to fix the claim that GetWindowText can "break the rules", since that is completely wrong? (The part about "stored inside the process virtual memory", while misleading because the process doesn't own the memory, is at least correct insofar as the memory is mapped into the target's virtual memory space.) –  Ben Voigt Feb 3 '14 at 17:36
    
No, your own style makes it clear to me that you value technical correctness over soft language. So I try to use them same when communicating with you. The final paragraph is still wrong after the edit. SendMessage doesn't break any rules either. Like all user-mode code, it can't reach into other processes, it has to make a syscall and have the kernel perform the access. –  Ben Voigt Feb 3 '14 at 18:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.