Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When using JQuery.Deferred is it OK to invoke reject() directly? Without having invoked a async function?

Perhaps I want some kind of test in the beginning of my async function. If the test fails I want to reject immediately. See the first if block below.

function doSomethingAsync() {

    //Test if the ajax call should be invoked
    var testFailed = true;

    var dfd = $.Deferred();

    //Check if test failed
    if (testFailed) {
        var asyncResult = {
            success: false,
            data: 'test failed'
        };

        //Is this OK usage of reject on the same thread?
        dfd.reject(asyncResult);

        return dfd.promise();
    }


    $.get('/api/testapi/get').done(function (data) {
        var asyncResult = {
            success: true,
            data: data
        };

        dfd.resolve(asyncResult);
    }).fail(function (err) {
        var asyncResult = {
            success: false,
            data: err
        };

        dfd.reject(asyncResult);
    });

    return dfd.promise();
}
share|improve this question
2  
Yes, it's ok to call reject when you want to reject. In fact this is a reason why this method exists. You still want your doSomethingAsync to return promise object, hence your approach is ok. In this case doSomethingAsync().fail(callback) will always work as expected. – dfsq Feb 2 '14 at 10:28
    
@dfsq Don't you want to make your comment to an answer? :) – zord Feb 2 '14 at 10:46
    
Thanks. I guess I don't know/understand how the Deferred object works. I just seems strange to invoke reject before the promise is returned, but it's great that I can =) – Niclas Feb 2 '14 at 11:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When using JQuery.Deferred is it OK to invoke reject() directly? Without having invoked a async function?

Yes, it's totally OK to return an already rejected promise, and to reject deferreds immediately. You only might need to verify that your callbacks don't rely on asynchronous resolution, which jQuery does not guarantee (in contrast to A+ implementations).

Notice that in your code you should use then instead of manually resolving the deferred:

function doSomethingAsync() {

    var testFailed = /* Test if the ajax call should be invoked */;

    var dfd = testFailed 
          ? $.Deferred().reject('test failed')
          : $.get('/api/testapi/get');

    return dfd.then(function (data) {
        return {
            success: true,
            data: data
        };
    }, function (err) {
        return {
            success: false,
            data: err
        };
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip about using then. In which cases would I manually resolve the deferred? When not having another promise to use like a custom async method with a window.setTimeout? – Niclas Feb 3 '14 at 14:18
    
Yes, exactly. Or when you need to create a promise out of nowhere, like we've done for the test failed-rejection. But when you already have a promise around (like the one from $.ajax), you should always use then - error handlers, notifications, implicit arguments will automatically be handled and cannot be forgotten. – Bergi Feb 3 '14 at 17:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.