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I am trying to construct a simple pixel-art game in html.

The basic idea is to make a fixed-size div inside which I am placing my images in pixel coordinates. I would like to keep individual img tags as I then can easily work with the mouse events (clicks) on them. I have this up and working:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<style>
.game_area {
    position:relative;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="game_area" style="width:320px;height:160px;" >
        <img src="field_base.png" style="position:absolute;left:0px;top:0px;" />
        <img src="field_base.png" style="position:absolute;left:16px;top:8px;" />
    </div>
</body>
</html>

This is just a very basic test. "field_base.png" is a sample image 32x16 px in size:

field_base.png

Works fine.

Now I want to scale the whole thing to somewhat better visible, but I want to retain the pixel visuals. For a simple image I found this solution:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<style type="text/css">
.pixelart {
        image-rendering: -moz-crisp-edges;         /* Firefox */
        image-rendering:   -o-crisp-edges;         /* Opera */
        image-rendering: -webkit-optimize-contrast;/* Webkit (non-standard naming) */
        image-rendering: crisp-edges;
        -ms-interpolation-mode: nearest-neighbor;  /* IE (non-standard property) */
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <img src="example.png" width="75%" class="pixelart" />
</body>
</html>

example.png is a pixel-art-image with size 168 x 97. Chose anyone you like.

This also works fine.

My question is now: can I get both together? Can I somehow "scale" my div-container in the upper example to, e.g., 75% page width, but keeping the pixel-content and pixel-based coordinates for the images inside?

Or do I have to use the canvas element and do the mouse interaction the hard way?

share|improve this question
    
You'll have to try it yourself cuz we don't have enough code to actually test anything against anyway. Are you using a draggable-type library or what? –  Deryck Feb 2 at 12:09
    
In fact, the code I am currently starting with is billions of times simpler than you seem to expect. The code I have shown in my question is almost complete! I edit the rest in. –  Knowleech Feb 2 at 17:53
    
Sorry what I meant was to verify your pixel map conundrum, you'll probably have to just trial-and-error to see whether you get the result you need or not. I'm not entirely sure what exactly is relying on those coordinates remaining unchanged so I can't speculate any further :( –  Deryck Feb 2 at 18:03
    
The whole idea is to re-create the feel of old-school games. That is why I start of with the 32x16px Tile of one field of the board (image in my post). The html example 1 places two of these Iso-Fields side by side (using the pixel offset 16x8). As the image is a png with transparency, both tiles fit together exactly. I will use a bunch of images that way to piece together the whole game board. The whole board will have a size of about 320x240px. I want to scale the whole thing to fit in some area of my website. -- I would love to do some trail-and-error, but I just don't know where to start. –  Knowleech Feb 3 at 13:32

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