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i have a c++ program to overload less than operator and an error- type name expected. i want to overload < operator for just study of 12th class.

  bool operator <(abc x,abc y)
   {
     return(x.a<y.a);
   }

The full program:

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
class abc
 {
  int a;
  public:
  abc()
  {
   a=0;
   }
  abc(int x)
  {
   a=x;
  }
  void show()
  {
   cout<<"\n"<<a;
  }

  bool operator <(abc x,abc y)
   {
     return(x.a<y.a);
   }


 };
void main()
 {
  clrscr();
  abc p(4),q(2);
  p.show();
  q.show();
  if(p<q)
   cout<<"\nP is Less than Q";
  getch();
 }
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1  
Can you show the error? And possibly provide an SSCCE? –  Joseph Mansfield Feb 2 at 12:03
1  
Please make an effort to format your code properly - also please do not use void main. –  Paul R Feb 2 at 12:07
1  
iostream.h? Really? In the 16 years since the first C++ standard was released, this has never been correct. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 2 at 13:51
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3 Answers

The problem is that when you define operator< as a member function, it should only take one argument which is the second operand of the operator. The first operand is the object denoted by *this:

bool operator<(const abc& y)
{
  return(this->a < y.a);
}

Note that main should return an int.

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but error still remain..... –  arsha Feb 2 at 12:13
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You defined the operator as a member function. In this case the left operand of the operator is this

The Correct definition will look as

bool operator <( const abc &rhs ) const
{
     return ( a < rhs.a );
}

Though it would be better if you would define it as a non-member function. For example

class abc
{
//...
   friend bool operator <( const abc &lhs, const abc &rhs );
//...
};

bool operator <<( const abc &lhs, const abc &rhs )
{
   return ( lhs.a < rhs.a );
} 

Take into account that function main shall have return type int

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yeah...!!! thanks bro...!! it worked... –  arsha Feb 2 at 13:02
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The operator< function should take only one argument. try this:

  bool operator <(abc& other)
   {
     return(a < other.a );
   }
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