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If I have the following scenario

public interface IFace
{
     int NoseSize {get; set;}
}


public class Face: IFace
{
    private int NoseSize;

    public int IFace.NoseSize
    {
        get { return ClassLevel.NoseSize}
        set { ClassLevel.NoseSize = value}
    }
}

How do I really indicate "ClassLevel"?

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1  
When using explicit implementation, you can not use the "public" modifier. –  Fernando Jan 28 '10 at 0:07
    
what's the use of this kind of implementation anyway? –  Beatles1692 Jan 28 '10 at 0:10
1  
@Beatles1692: it allows a class to implement two or more interfaces with members that have the same name. Besides that, you can use it as a 'hack' when you want to implement an internal interface without expose the members defined by the interface. –  Fernando Jan 28 '10 at 0:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Simply refer to it as NoseSize or this.NoseSize if you like.


By the way, you are not correctly implementing the interface. If you want to use explicit interface implementation, you cannot specify an access modifier.

If you want to implement the interface implicitly, you should omit the interface name and simply have a public member that matches the interface member name and signature. Of course, if you do that, you can't have an identically named field in the same class.

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You would alleviate the name clash by renaming:

private int NoseSize;

to:

private int noseSize;

I'm sure it varies by region, company, etc, but I believe it's typical to use camelCase for private members.

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1  
Actually, it's camelCase that's recommended for private fields. PascalCase is this one. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 28 '10 at 0:05
    
and some people prefer using an underscore prefix when naming private fields such as private int _noSize; –  Beatles1692 Jan 28 '10 at 0:09
    
Thank-you, Mehrdad. I have some sort of long-standing mental block ensuring that I will always mix up camelCase and PascalCase. :facepalm: –  JMD Jan 28 '10 at 0:34

think of an interface as a Contract. What you are doing is saying that anything that is derived from your interface (IFace) is gaurenteed to have these members and/or methods. It is up to the deriving class to actually implement them. The other thing that it does for you is provides "IsA" relationship for the classes that are derived from the interface.

alternatly, you could do like this....

public class Face: IFace
{
    public int NoseSize
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void foo()
    {
        this.NoseSize = 42;
        int someSize = this.NoseSize;
    }
}
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You should use the InterfaceName.Member notation in order to refer to a member that is implemented using explicit interface implementation.So if you omit the IInterfaceName. part it means you are referring to a non explicit implemented member (class level member as you call it).

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