Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a perl subroutine and I would like to have the flexibility to either pass in values as a hash, or just as single values. I would like to know how the arguments are passed to the subroutine, so that I can handle the cases separately. For example:

#case 1, pass in hash
test(arg1 => 'test', arg2 => 'test2');

#case 2, just pass in single values
test('test', 'test2');

sub test { 
    #if values passed in as a hash, handle one way
    if(...) { 

    }
    #if values passed in as single values, do something else
    else { 

    }
}

Is there a way to detect this in perl? Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What I would do using an anonymous HASH reference :

#case 1, pass in hash
test({arg1 => 'test', arg2 => 'test2'});

#case 2, just pass in single values
test('test', 'test2');

sub test { 
    my $arg = shift;

    if(ref $arg eq 'HASH') { 
        ...;
    }
    #if values passed in as single values, do something else
    else { 
         ...;
    }
}

See
http://perldoc.perl.org/perlref.html
http://perldoc.perl.org/perlreftut.html

share|improve this answer
    
That's a great solution! What's nice is I could also flip it around and have the hash reference around the single values if I want. Thanks! –  srchulo Feb 2 at 21:16
1  
not sure what you mean by "around the single values"? –  ysth Feb 2 at 21:27
    
I'd use if (@_ == 1) instead of if (ref $arg eq 'HASH'). It's usually buggy to check a value's type in Perl, and here is no exception. –  ikegami Feb 2 at 21:43
    
@ikegami - actually I'd probably do both! arg2 might be optional, in which case test('test') would be a valid call. If you look at the constructors for Moose/Moo classes, they generally do something like if (@_==1 and ref($_[0])=='HASH') { ... } else { ... }. –  tobyink Feb 2 at 22:09
1  
You can't wrap arbitrary scalars with curlies because you'll lose arguments if you have the same value twice at odd positions. Because you'll lose order, so you won't know which value was for which parameter. Because arguments at odd positions will be converted to strings. You can only use a hash ref if you have key-value pairs. –  ikegami Feb 2 at 22:56

The other answer is perfectly fine (and I've plusplussed it), but in the spirit of There's More That One Way To Do It™, and in the interest of pimping my own wares...

use v5.14;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Kavorka qw( multi fun );

# define a function with positional arguments
multi fun test (Str $arg1, Str $arg2) {
   say "positional";
   say "\$arg1 is $arg1";
   say "\$arg2 is $arg2";
}

# define a function with named arguments
multi fun test (Str :$arg1, Str :$arg2) {
   say "named";
   say "\$arg1 is $arg1";
   say "\$arg2 is $arg2";
}

# Call the function with positional arguments
test('foo', 'bar');

# Call the function with named arguments
test(arg1 => 'foo', arg2 => 'bar');

# Call the function with named arguments again
test({ arg1 => 'foo', arg2 => 'bar' });
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.