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Say I have the following HTML (condensed):

<div><div><div><ul><li>Text</li></ul></div></div></div>
<div><div><div><ul><li>Text 2</li></ul></div></div></div>
<div><div><div><ul><li>Text 3</li></ul></div></div></div>

I want to remove the lowest child elements first, until ultimately removing the parent, then move on to the next parent element and its children. This can be easily accomplished by a simple loop that goes through each child element, removes it, then removes the next child element (i.e. parent of the previous child):

var children = $("body").find("*");
var i = children.length;
function loop() {
    $(children[i]).remove();
    i--;
    if (i > -1) {
        setTimeout(loop, 20);
    }
}
loop();

The problem with this, however, is that it removes the child elements from the lowest parent element first. If you were to run this code with my test markup, you could see what I mean.

I want to remove the child elements from the top most parent, then work my way down, therefore reversing the order of the above code. I was able to somewhat accomplish this with the following code:

var parents = $("body").children(":not(:empty)");
var i = 0;
var speed = 1000;
function loop() {
    var children = $(parents[i]).find("*");
    var x = children.length;
    function inside() {
        $(children[x]).remove();
        x--;
        if (x > -1) {
            setTimeout(inside, speed);
        } else if (i < parents.length) {
            $(parents[i - 1]).remove();
            loop();
        } else if (i === parents.length) {
            $(parents[i - 1]).remove();
        }
    }
    inside();
    i++;
}
loop();

The problem with this code, however, is that it only reverses the order of deleting with respect to the parent element. If there are multiple child elements within a parent, it will still delete them in the default ascending order (bottom to top).

My question, therefore, is how can I delete all the elements in descending order, regardless of how many child elements there are, in a much cleaner fashion? There has to be a much better approach than what I attempted. jQuery isn't a requirement either. The reason for the setTimeouts is because I need a delay between removing the elements. As usual, I probably overlooked something relatively simple, so bear with me.

To reiterate, if the HTML looks like this:

<div>
    <div>Child 1</div>
    <div>Child 2</div>
    <div>
        <div>Child 3</div>
        <div>Child 4</div>
    </div>
</div>

I would want it to be deleted in the following order:

  1. Child 1
  2. Child 2
  3. Child 3
  4. Child 4
share|improve this question
    
Please write some example html code and order in which you would like elements deleted –  Xyzk Feb 3 '14 at 0:03
    
@Trojan That is correct. So, remove all the children in chronological order (or by their appearance, top to bottom). –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 0:03
1  
Is adding a child class acceptable? then your code will work fine jsfiddle.net/zdL5W/4 –  megawac Feb 3 '14 at 0:16
    
@megawac I suppose you could, although I feel that there are other ways that don't require changing classes. But interesting idea nonetheless, I didn't think of it. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 0:20
    
@megawac I actually screwed up the edit to my post. The code you posted is more or less identical to the first code I wrote, which removes them in the incorrect (to me) ascending sorting order. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First build a post-order (aka child first) version of the DOM tree using the following recursive function:

var nodes = [];

function generate()
{
    $(this).children().each(generate);
    nodes.push(this);
}

generate.call($('body'));

Then, iterate as per normal:

var i = 0;

function loop() 
{
    $(nodes[i]).remove();
    if (++i < nodes.length) {
        setTimeout(loop, 1000);
    }
}

loop();

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
I think I made a relatively incredibly important mistake in my post. When I edited the post after Xyzk's comment, I had the order wrong in the example of how they should be deleted. Your code is running in the same order as mine. I updated the post, sorry for the confusion. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 0:27
1  
@Charlie Okay, updated answer :) –  Ja͢ck Feb 3 '14 at 1:31

Algorithm idea in pseudocode:

RemoveNode( node) { 
for(i=node.children.length-1;i>=0;i--){
    RemoveNode(node.children[i]);
}
remove(self);
return;
}

Added actual code according to pseudocode:

function RemoveNode(node){
    for(var i = node.children.length - 1; i >= 0; i--){
        RemoveNode(node.children[i]);
    }
    $(node).remove();
}

Pseudocode with breaks to see how algorithm works. No idea why, but I can't make it work with delay.

function RemoveNode(node){
    for(var i = node.children.length - 1; i >= 0; i--){
      RemoveNode(node.children[i]);
        alert("hi");
    }
    $(node).remove();
}

RemoveNode($(".parent")[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
An actual example would be much more helpful. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:01
1  
@Charlie - I added it. (Not tested yet) –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 3 '14 at 1:07
    
@Derek朕會功夫 Thank you. I tested this, but I wasn't entire sure how to call it. I attempted RemoveNode($(".parent")[0]); but it just removed the entire element in one swoop. I think I'm missing an important step though. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:14
    
@Charlie I can't for some reason add any version which would "sleep" for some time, but I added one which will create alert every time it deletes something. –  Xyzk Feb 3 '14 at 1:37

I think this does what you want:

removeLast();

function removeLast(){
    var o = document.getElementById("root"), p = o;
    while (p.lastChild) p = p.lastChild;
    p.parentNode.removeChild(p);
    if(o != p) setTimeout(removeLast,20);
}

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
It might, but there's no delay involved (which I why I opted for timeouts, since there doesn't seem like a great way to delay while loops). –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 0:42
1  
I forgot about the timeout... the timeout goes with the recursive call (edited). –  ic3b3rg Feb 3 '14 at 2:51

I'm not sure I understand the question fully, but maybe this is what you're looking for?

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/xT3Au/1/

var $parents = $('.parent');

$parents.each(function(i) {
    var $tree = $(this).find('*').addBack();
    $tree.sort(function(a, b) {
        return $(a).find('*').length - $(b).find('*').length;
    }).each(function(j, el) {
        var speed = 1000 * (j + 1 + i * $tree.length);
        setTimeout(function(){ $(el).remove() }, speed);
    });
});

I think using classes to know which parents should follow which order would be easier. Otherwise it would be quite difficult to figure out the order. Try playing with the sorting function in any case if I got it wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
When I run your example, it simply removes the parent entirely. What I'm looking for is a way to remove all the elements on the page in reverse order, so removing top most first then bottom most last (descending order). –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:00
    
What do you mean? It works for me like in your example but starts removing the inner children in descending order. I tested in Firefox and Chrome. What browser are you in? –  elclanrs Feb 3 '14 at 1:02
    
I figured. Safari 7.0.1. Nothing in the console. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:03
    
Must be the sort function... See if this works in Safari jsfiddle.net/xT3Au/1 –  elclanrs Feb 3 '14 at 1:04
    
This one "sort" (get it) of works. It removes the lowest children in descending order, but then reverts back to ascending order for the parents of those children. So, it removes the li elements from top to bottom, but then removes the ul elements from bottom to top. –  Charlie Feb 3 '14 at 1:07

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