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I have a Singleton class that has two methods:

- (void)saveString:(NSString *)stringObject {

    [[[Singleton sharedInstance] stringArray] addObject:stringObject];
}

- (NSArray *)getArrayContents {

    return [[Singelton sharedInstance] stringArray];
}

Here is the implementation code of my Singleton class:

static Singleton *sharedSingleton = nil;

+ (Singleton *) sharedInstance {

    if (sharedSingleton == nil) {
        sharedSingleton = [[super alloc] init];
    }
    return sharedSingleton;
}

I have two View Controllers (vcA, and vcB) in my application. What I am trying to do is temporarily store the data from vcA, so that the data inside stringArray will be accessible later to vcB.

Here is the code that vcA uses to store the data:

[[Singleton sharedInstance] saveString:stringName];

Later in the lifecycle of the application, vcB calls the Singleton class to retrieve the values from the NSMutableArray:

NSArray *newArray = [[Singleton sharedInstance] getArrayContents];
       for (NSString *test in newArray) {
           NSLog(@"Here are the contents of the array %@", test);
       }

Unfortunately, when I make the call in vcB to print the contents of the Array, there is no output because the array is empty, despite the fact that values are added to the array. Can anyone see what it is I'm doing wrong?

Thanks in advance to all who reply.

share|improve this question
    
How did you implement the singleton? –  cahn Feb 3 at 1:21
    
What do you mean? –  syedfa Feb 3 at 1:27
    
Showing your singleton code will help people identify the problem. –  cahn Feb 3 at 1:31
    
The methods at the top is from my Singleton class (saveString, getArrayContents). –  syedfa Feb 3 at 1:32
    
I've added the implementation code of my Singleton class in my question. –  syedfa Feb 3 at 1:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First off, these two methods should probably use self, not sharedInstance:

- (void)saveString:(NSString *)stringObject {

    [[self stringArray] addObject:stringObject];
}

- (NSArray *)getArrayContents {

    return [self stringArray];
}

Second, there’s no point in having a getArrayContents method when you already have stringArray, and get as a prefix is usually reserved for methods that take a parameter to be copied into, anyhow.

Third, I don’t see you initializing stringArray anywhere, so unless there’s code missing, it’s nil and it’s staying nil. Maybe try:

+ (Singleton *) sharedInstance {

    if (!sharedSingleton) {
        sharedSingleton = [[self alloc] init];
        sharedSingleton.stringArray = [NSMutableArray new];
    }
    return sharedSingleton;
}

Assuming stringArray is declared something like:

@property (readwrite, strong) NSMutableArray *stringArray;
share|improve this answer
1  
Can this be right: [[super alloc] init]?? –  Hot Licks Feb 3 at 2:41
    
@hot Oh, crap, didn’t notice that, was just copy/pasting. Thanks! It’d happen to work in this case, because nobody implements alloc in their subclasses these days, but it’s still sloppy as heck. –  Wil Shipley Feb 3 at 8:52
    
I'm not sure whether it would work or not. How does super alloc get the object size? –  Hot Licks Feb 3 at 12:43
    
It looks at the class, but the class still reports itself as the subclass when you call super. Like, if you call [super description] on a subclass of NSObject, it still returns the description of the subclass, not NSObject itself. –  Wil Shipley Feb 4 at 0:17
    
I'm not so sure. Might have to try a few scenarios. –  Hot Licks Feb 4 at 1:22

Try this,

to create Singleton

+(Singleton *)sharedSingleton {

    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static Singleton *sharedSingleton;
    dispatch_once(&once, ^{
        sharedSingleton = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return sharedSingleton;
}

and the init method of singleton class

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        //@property stringArray
        self.stringArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

Other methods of Singleton

- (void)saveString:(NSString *)stringObject {

    [self.stringArray addObject:stringObject];
}

- (NSArray *)getArrayContents {

    return self.stringArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried to change "singleton" to "singleton" - but edits must be at least six characters!!! That's a daft rule. Apart from that, this is the generally accepted pattern to create a singleton object that everyone should use. –  gnasher729 Mar 4 at 18:50
    
@gnasher729 I have changed it. Thanks for the edit. –  Akhilrajtr Mar 6 at 6:07

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