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I'm trying to mock a method call that takes a call-by-name argument:

import org.scalatest.WordSpec
import org.scalatest.mock.MockitoSugar
import org.mockito.Mockito._
import org.junit.runner.RunWith
import org.scalatest.junit.JUnitRunner

trait Collaborator {
   def doSomething(t: => Thing)
}

trait Thing

@RunWith(classOf[JUnitRunner])
class Test extends WordSpec with MockitoSugar {
   "The subject under test" should {
      "call the collaborator" in {
         // setup
         val m = mock[Collaborator]
         val t = mock[Thing]

         // test code: this would actually be invoked by the SUT
         m.doSomething(t)

         // verify the call
         verify(m).doSomething(t)
      }
   }
}

I'm primarily interested in Mockito since that's what I'm using, but I'd be interested to see whether any of the major mock frameworks is capable of this kind of testing. The Test fails at runtime on the verify line, with an error like

Argument(s) are different! Wanted:  
collaborator.doSomething(  
   ($anonfun$apply$3) <function>  
);  
-> at Test$$anonfun$1$$anonfun$apply$1.apply(Test.scala:27)  
Actual invocation has different arguments:  
collaborator.doSomething(  
    ($anonfun$apply$2) <function>  
);  
-> at Test$$anonfun$1$$anonfun$apply$1.apply(Test.scala:24)  

If I'm understanding the situation correctly, the compiler is implicitly wrapping t in a nullary function that returns t. The mock framework is then comparing that function to the one produced in the test code, which is equivalent but not equals().

My case is a relatively simple version of the problem, but I think this would be an issue with any higher-order function.

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3  
I don't understand how this relates to the Apple iPad. –  Mitch Blevins Jan 28 '10 at 5:58
    
Could you describe how it doesn't work more clearly or include some test code. It's hard to know what's going on here with just the verify shown. –  Geoff Reedy Jan 28 '10 at 14:49
    
I made the example runnable as written and included the actual output associated with the failure. –  Aaron Novstrup Jan 28 '10 at 20:56
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This looks ugly, but hopefully it can help you to find good solution:

import org.scalatest.mock.MockitoSugar
import org.mockito.Mockito._

trait Collaborator {
   def doSomething(t: => Thing)
}

trait Thing

new MockitoSugar {
     // setup
     val m = mock[Collaborator]
     val t = mock[Thing]

     m.doSomething(t)

     classOf[Collaborator].getMethod("doSomething", classOf[Function0[_]]).invoke(
        verify(m), 
        new Function0[Thing] { 
            def apply() = null
            override def equals(o: Any): Boolean = t == o.asInstanceOf[Function0[Thing]].apply() 
      })
}
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This problem seems to be specific to by-name invocations because in regular higher order functions you can match against the explicit FunctionX object:

verify(collaborator).somethingElse(any(Function2[String, Thing]))

in the by-name case the wrapping of the argument into a Function0 is done implicitly, and Alexey's answer shows how to invoke the mock with an explicit parameter.

You could write something akin to your own verify which would apply arguments captured by mockito.

Mockito internally records invocation and their arguments with e.g.: http://code.google.com/p/mockito/source/browse/trunk/src/org/mockito/internal/matchers/CapturingMatcher.java

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This does not work, as the function expects a single call-by-name parameter of type Thing (: => Thing), which is not the same type as Function2[String, Thing] (:String => Thing). There needs to be a higher-kinded type for typing call-by-name parameters in order to use matchers. –  Woodz Jun 11 '13 at 18:18
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You might want to take a look at Borachio:

http://www.borachio.com/

A native Scala mocking framework that I released recently. If it doesn't work for you, please let me know!

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Looks interesting, but I saw a few turn-offs: expectations, and symbols for method names. As you continue design/development, I suggest taking a look at this: monkeyisland.pl/2008/01/14/mockito. It would be really cool to have a native Scala mocking framework that supports multiple mocking styles. –  Aaron Novstrup Mar 7 '11 at 20:50
    
Symbols for method names are an unavoidable consequence of not using cglib or similar. And because my primary motivation is something that will work on Android, whose Dalvik VM doesn't support cglib, that's a non-starter for me, I'm afraid. I'm very happy to accept contributions, however :-) I also have plans to look at a compiler plugin, which will possibly provide another route, but that's low down on the priority list I'm afraid. –  Paul Butcher Mar 7 '11 at 23:42
    
Regarding Mockito, I'm familiar with it. I remain to be convinced that the Mockito approach makes sense for a language with a functional flavour like Scala, however. There's a discussion about this on the Scala User mailing list: groups.google.com/group/scala-user/browse_thread/thread/… I'm happy to listen to counterarguments, however, if you believe otherwise. –  Paul Butcher Mar 7 '11 at 23:46
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You can try specs2. In specs2, we "hijack" the Mockito Invocation class to account for byname parameters:

trait ByName { def call(i: =>Int) = i }
val byname = mock[ByName]

byname.call(10)
there was one(byname).call(10)
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