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require 'spec_helper'

describe UsersController do
  let(:user){ double(User, id: 2, name: "Jimbo", email: 'jimbo@email.com', password: 'passwordhuzzah', password_confirmation: 'passwordhuzzah') }

  before do
    mock_model("User")
  end

  describe 'PATCH #update' do
    User.should_receive(:find).with(user.id.to_s).and_return user      
    user.should_receive(:update_attributes).with({ "email" => user.email, "name" => user.name, "password" => user.password, "password_confirmation" => user.password_confirmation })#.and_return true

    patch :update, id: user.id, user: { email: user.email, name: user.name, password: user.password, password_confirmation: user.password_confirmation }

    flash[:error].should == "could not update user"
    response.status.should == 200
  end
end

codebase:

def update
    @user = User.find(params[:id])

    if @user.update_attributes(user_params)
        redirect_to @user, flash: { success: 'succesfully updated user' }
    else
        flash.now[:error] = "could not update user"
        render 'edit'
    end
end

While the above spec passes (and passes in just 0.05 seconds!) am I doing it correctly? With the mocks above the request, and the 'normal' expectations below it? It seems a bit clumsy. Not only is it hard to read, but if one expectation fails, all of them will appear to fail.

What makes me think I'm doing it wrong is a weird error I'm getting. See the second line of the describe block, where I'm saying the instance of user (user) should have its update_attributes triggered with updated attributes? Note the and_return true method I've commented out. When it's chained on, running the above spec hits me with this stinker:

  1) UsersController should_receive
     Failure/Error: patch :update, id: user.id, user: { email: user.email, name: user.name, password: user.password, password_confirmation: user.password_confirmation }
     NoMethodError:
       undefined method `model_name' for RSpec::Mocks::Mock:Class

While this a over my head, I think it's because the user 'instance' isn't actually an instance, just a hash. I thought because I used mock_model and the double inherits from that mocked model, all of the active-record-y stuff such as the 'model_name' method would be set.

Anyway, how should I write this spec properly? I don't want to use FactoryGirl, I want to keep it all contained so my specs are fast and accurately report a fault.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, in this case of controller testing, your basic flow is "normal", except that your innermost code needs to be within an it block (and perhaps is and is just not transcribed properly).

However, you're not making use of the mock_model call, since you're not doing anything with the result. This method doesn't make any fundamental changes to the class whose string name you pass it, it simply creates a mock object that simulates an ActiveRecord instance, which in your case you effectively discard. Like all RSpec doubles, the first parameter is just giving it a name that can be used for error messages and such.

So yes, the reason you're getting the error when you return true is that redirect_to expects @user to be an ActiveRecord instance and while it's not just a Hash as you suggest it might be, it does not have the model_name method it needs.

There are lots of ways to rewrite this, particularly if you want to support both the success and failure cases, but one way that minimizes the changes is (not fully tested):

describe UsersController do
  let(:user){ mock_model(User, id: 2, name: "Jimbo", email: 'jimbo@email.com', password: 'passwordhuzzah', password_confirmation: 'passwordhuzzah') }

  describe 'PATCH #update' do
    it "should fail in this case" do
      User.should_receive(:find).with(user.id.to_s).and_return user      
      user.should_receive(:update_attributes).with({ "email" => user.email, "name" => user.name, "password" => user.password, "password_confirmation" => user.password_confirmation })#.and_return true

      patch :update, id: user.id, user: { email: user.email, name: user.name, password: user.password, password_confirmation: user.password_confirmation }

      flash[:error].should == "could not update user"
      response.status.should == 200
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Surprised this is the correct way to write the it block! This doesn't seem DRY at all. Let's say I wanted the update_attributes call to return true in one it block, and then false in a second. Would I seriously need to copy-paste the mocks (and change that one, tiny .and_returns method), the request, and possibly some of the expectations into a new it block? I would have just thought rspec would allow me to use contexts or something. Should I write a method that does the mocking and makes the request, with one argument that determines what the update_attributes returns? Is that done? –  Starkers Feb 3 at 21:43
    
There are a certainly ways to dry this up. You can use let for common elements, like the patch call and the Hash argument to update_attributes. You can use before for the User.should_receive .... And/or you can use a "shared example" with a boolean parameter for the return value of the update_attributes mock. –  Peter Alfvin Feb 3 at 21:54
    
I updated the answer slightly to put the sample code in perspective. –  Peter Alfvin Feb 3 at 21:55
    
Thanks, Peter! I've also broken my comment out into a a separate question if you're interested –  Starkers Feb 3 at 22:02
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