Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Now I can get this jobs done using

x <- expand.grid(1:98, 1:99, 1:100);
x.subset <- subset(x, Var1 < Var2 & Var2 < Var3)

But is there a more elegant way? I think the step where x is created can be dropped. Imagine if I want to do this for a < b < c < 10,000. The expand grid would fail on lesser machines (I know x.subset would be humongous too!, but I have a better chance of creating it if I can skip the step where x is created.).

share|improve this question
    
There is no way that up until 10,000 would fit into memory (9.997e+11 elements). I think you've got a pretty good version right here –  PascalvKooten Feb 3 at 10:33
1  
What do you intend to do with these combinations? –  Roland Feb 3 at 10:47

3 Answers 3

There is no way that up until 10,000 would fit into memory (9998 * 9999 * 10000 == 9.997e+11 elements). Even a 1000 won't fit. I think you've got a pretty good version right here that performs fast for roughly up until 100, but going much above it simply won't be possible.

However, perhaps reconsider your "need" for this approach, and see if there might be another way to achieve it.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd give your final statement a "+100" . Trust the Data Munger Guru (not me) when he says "tell me the problem you want solved, not how you want to solve it." –  Carl Witthoft Feb 3 at 12:25
    
From where do you get the requirement that the 3 elements need to sum to 100? I don't see that in the question. –  Roland Feb 3 at 12:41
    
Oh, my bad. Removed. –  PascalvKooten Feb 3 at 12:42

combn should be useful here. Example:

combn(1:4, 3)
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
#[1,]    1    1    1    2
#[2,]    2    2    3    3
#[3,]    3    4    4    4

However, up to 10.000 will still be problematic and there is probably some better algorithm to get to your final goal.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting thought: can you run a time-benchmark of the OP's approach vs., say combn followed by rejecting all columns which are not in ascending order? something like if (any(diff(order(column) )<0)... ? –  Carl Witthoft Feb 3 at 12:27
    
@CarlWitthoft I believe combn already returns the the desired order. No post-processing required. –  Roland Feb 3 at 12:36
    
You're right, of course. Silly me. –  Carl Witthoft Feb 3 at 12:38
    
This approach is slower though than what xiaodai mentioned. Median time of 377.9203 vs 244.3379 milliseconds according to microbenchmark (neval=100). –  PascalvKooten Feb 3 at 12:45
    
@PascalvKooten My timings are 325.7292 for the code in the question vs. 270.1952 for combn(1:100,3). I would be very surprised if expand.grid and subset were faster than combn. –  Roland Feb 3 at 12:51

Posting as an answer for readability. My timing shows cgrid winning. R302, Windows7, i7 processor (single-core utilized, of course).

Rgames> cgrid <-function(x,y,z) {
+ x <- expand.grid(1:98, 1:99, 1:100);
+ x.subset <- subset(x, Var1 < Var2 & Var2 < Var3)
+ }
Rgames> ccomb<-function(z) combn(1:z,3)  
Rgames>  microbenchmark(cgrid(1:98,1:99,1:100),ccomb(100),times=10)
Unit: milliseconds
                     expr        min         lq      median         uq
 cgrid(1:98, 1:99, 1:100) 217.330657 220.113192 253.5495825 325.167895
               ccomb(100) 336.545629 346.839341 358.8957100 380.154500
        max neval
 346.787171    10
 452.278904    10
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.