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I've been struggling with formatting numbers in R using what I feel are very sensible rules. What I would want is to specify a number of significant digits (say 3), keep significant zeroes, and also keep all digits before the decimal point, some examples (with 3 significant digits):

1.23456 -> "1.23"
12.3456 -> "12.3"
123.456 -> "123"
1234.56 -> "1235"
12345.6 -> "12346"
1.50000 -> "1.50"
1.49999 -> "1.50"

Is there a function in R that does this kind of formatting? If not, how could it be done?

I feel these are quite sensible formatting rules, yet I have not managed to find a function that formats in this way in R. As far as I googled this is not a duplicate of many similar questions such as this

Edit:

Inspired by the two good answers I put together a function myself that I believe works for all cases:

sign_digits <- function(x,d){
  s <- format(x,digits=d)
  if(grepl("\\.", s) && ! grepl("e", s)) {
    n_sign_digits <- nchar(s) - 
      max( grepl("\\.", s), attr(regexpr("(^[-0.]*)", s), "match.length") )
    n_zeros <- max(0, d - n_sign_digits)
    s <- paste(s, paste(rep("0", n_zeros), collapse=""), sep="")
  }
  s
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

format(num,3) comes very close.

format(1.23456,digits=3)
# [1] "1.23"
format(12.3456,digits=3)
# [1] "12.3"
format(123.456,digits=3)
# [1] "123"
format(1234.56,digits=3)
# [1] "1235"
format(12345.6,digits=3)
# [1] "12346"
format(1.5000,digits=3)
# [1] "1.5"
format(1.4999,digits=3)
# [1] "1.5"

Your rules are not actually internally consistent. You want 1234.56 to round down to 1234, yet you want 1.4999 to round up to 1.5.

EDIT This appears to deal with the very valid point made by @Henrik.

sigDigits <- function(x,d){
  z <- format(x,digits=d)
  if (!grepl("[.]",z)) return(z)
  require(stringr)
  return(str_pad(z,d+1,"right","0"))
}

z <- c(1.23456, 12.3456, 123.456, 1234.56, 12345.6, 1.5000, 1.4999)
sapply(z,sigDigits,d=3)
# [1] "1.23"  "12.3"  "123"   "1235"  "12346" "1.50"  "1.50" 
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@Henrik - See my edits. Does this fix it? –  jlhoward Feb 3 '14 at 12:41
    
Sorry, I meant to write 1234.56 -> 1235 ... –  Rasmus Bååth Feb 3 '14 at 13:20
    
Hmm, I believe your solution does not treat, for example, 0.5 or 0.005 in the way I intended. sigDigits(0.00500, 3) results in 0.005 while I think it should result in 0.00500. IO've edited my question with an answer inspired by yours that I think (hope) works for all cases. :) –  Rasmus Bååth Feb 3 '14 at 14:14

As @jlhoward points out, your rounding rule is not consistent. Hence you should use a conditional statement:

x <- c(1.23456, 12.3456, 123.456, 1234.56, 12345.6, 1.50000, 1.49999) 
ifelse(x >= 100, sprintf("%.0f", x), ifelse(x < 100 & x >= 10, sprintf("%.1f", x), sprintf("%.2f", x)))
# "1.23"  "12.3"  "123"   "1235"  "12346" "1.50"  "1.50"

It's hard to say the intended usage, but it might be better to use consistent rounding. Exponential notation could be an option:

sprintf("%.2e", x)
[1] "1.23e+00" "1.23e+01" "1.23e+02" "1.23e+03" "1.23e+04" "1.50e+00" "1.50e+00"
share|improve this answer
    
Well, the indented usage is for nice formatting of numbers. I'm not a huge fan of scientific notation. Thank you for both you answers which I would accept if I could. I flipped a coin and jihoward won. –  Rasmus Bååth Feb 3 '14 at 13:27
    
@jlhoward's edited answer with the function solves the issue for a wider range of numbers. It will be helpful for others wanting something similar so it deserves to be the accepted answer =) –  Mikko Feb 3 '14 at 13:53

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