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I'm very new to this, and i'm trying to create a text based minesweeper. I want the player to decide how big he want the grid to be. My problem is, that the if-statement, that should make sure, the user types in a number from 1 to 10 doesn't work. Please have a look.

scanf ("%i/%i",&x,&y);
if (0 < x < 11 && 0 < y < 11)
{   
printf ("you have selected %i by %i\n",x,y);
for (i = 0; i < x; i++) 
    {
    for (j = 0; j < y; j++) 
        {
        grid[x][y] = 'O';
        printf ("%c ", grid[x][y]);
        }
    printf ("\n");
    }
}
else
printf ("Wrong gridsize");
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5 Answers 5

C does not support double comparisons like:

0 < x < 11

you should write instead

0 < x && x < 11.

It may be misleading, because the first statement is syntaxically correct (it compiles), but it does not do what you may believe: check both boundaries like in a mathematical expression (what python does for instance).

It's like if you had written

(0 < x) < 11

The first binary expression returns a boolean (well, really an int in C, a boolean in C++). This boolean once casted to int is 0 or 1, always below 11, henceforth the expression is always true.

Of course the same is true for checking y boundaries. Now you should be able to fix the problem by yourself.

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Who sad c does not support it... Try this if(9 < 6 == 0) printf("yes"); else printf("No"); –  Indra Yadav Feb 3 '14 at 11:31
1  
It is syntaxically correct but it does not do what you believe. In your example the left comparizon returns a boolean, the second comparizon compares this boolean to zero. There is no ternary operator other than ?: in C. All others are binary operators. –  kriss Feb 3 '14 at 11:57
    
@Indra Yadav: is it a joke on ambiguity of the word support or are you not a C programmer ? –  kriss Feb 3 '14 at 12:14
    
if not support then how above code is working.. i'll be glad if you will explain double comparisons in C.. and explain both 0 < x < 11 and 9 < 6 == 0 –  Indra Yadav Feb 3 '14 at 12:18
    
I did. Just read the answer. These expressions are treated as two individual statements from left to right. By the way the second one (9 < 6 == 0) is meaningless from a mathematical point of view, it has a meaning only in a context where 9 < 6 is first evaluated, and the result is then compared to zero (and zero means "False"). –  kriss Feb 3 '14 at 12:51

The if statement has to be like

if ((x > 0 && x < 11) && (y > 0 && y < 11))
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you have written wrong if statement. Here is correct form.

if ((x > 0 && x < 11) && (y > 0 && y < 11))

Here are the relational operators

>     greater than              5 > 4 is TRUE
<     less than                 4 < 5 is TRUE
>=    greater than or equal     4 >= 4 is TRUE
<=    less than or equal        3 <= 4 is TRUE
==    equal to                  5 == 5 is TRUE
!=    not equal to              5 != 4 is TRUE

C does not support double comparisons.

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In your scanf statement remove / operator change it to

scanf ("%i%i",&x,&y);

And what your if statement is doing is what you expect to do

if (0 < x < 11 && 0 < y < 11)

first when you enter the value x and y (x = 4 and y = 6)

It checks if x is greater than 0 (which is true ) so 1 is substituted in place of 0 < x

now its something like this for compiler 1 < 11 next it checks that which is also true similarly for y whichever value you enter will always be true.

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0 < x < 11

means (0 < x)<11. If x is 5, 0 < x will be 1 (true). Next evaluation will be 1 < 11, that will be true so the result is true.

But, if x = 20, 0<20 is 1, 1<11 is true as well, but you would expect a false result.

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