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How to produce the same string for x number of lines and then use paste to combine the files: I have a file as such with unknown number of lines, e.g.:

$ echo -e "a\tb\tc\nd\te\tf" > in.txt
$ cat in.txt
a   b   c
d   e   f

I want to concat the files with a new column that has the same string for every row. I have tried using echo to create a file and then using paste to concat the columns but i have to know the number of rows in in.txt first and then create a in2.txt using echo.

$ echo -e "a\tb\tc\nd\te\tf" > in.txt
$ cat in.txt
a   b   c
d   e   f
$ echo -e "x\nx\n" > in2.txt
$ paste in.txt in2.txt
a   b   c   x
d   e   f   x

How else can I achieve the same output for an unknown number of lines in in.txt?, e.g.

[in:]

a   b   c
d   e   f

[out:]

a   b   c   x
d   e   f   x

My data consist of a million lines with 3 columns in in.txt of 50-200 chars for each line, so solution needs to keep the "big" data size in mind.

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3  
Please explain why just changing every line using sed isn't possible (e. g. sed 's/$/\tx/'). –  Alfe Feb 3 at 12:00
    
it's possible to use sed but i would rather not mess with the encoding that comes from different unix environment. the default encoding for all files should remain as utf8 –  alvas Feb 3 at 12:54
    
sed in itself has no problem with utf8 encodings. It can work on bytestreams and ignore the encodings completely. Furthermore, utf8 is compatible to ASCII if the string in question is just a simple thing like x, so using it will work fine. I can imagine that you have additional restrictions you haven't told us about which still rule out sed, but imagining won't help find a solution ;-) So maybe you tell us a little more about the reason why sed should not work for your case … –  Alfe Feb 4 at 0:33
    
sed did the same job too =) –  alvas Feb 6 at 17:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way with join:

echo | join input - -a 1 -o "1.1 1.2 1.3 2.1" -e x

Though just doing a sed replace should be much better.

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