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One of the question asked in an interview was,

One table has 100 records. 50 of them are duplicates. Is it possible with a single query to delete the duplicate records from the table as well as select and display the remaining 50 records.

Is this possible in a single SQL query?

Thanks

SNA

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Why would you want/need to do this? – Travis Gockel Jan 28 '10 at 7:29
1  
It probably depends on the database engine but with SQL Server it is definitly possible. – Lieven Keersmaekers Jan 28 '10 at 8:30
2  
Oracle, Microsoft SQL server, mysql or other? please specify – kurast Jan 28 '10 at 14:04
    
yet another example of a terrible interview question. – Mitch Wheat Jan 28 '10 at 15:44
    
Its sql server. – SNA Jan 29 '10 at 11:51
up vote 6 down vote accepted

with SQL Server you would use something like this

DECLARE @Table TABLE (ID INTEGER, PossibleDuplicate INTEGER)

INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (1, 100)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (2, 100)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (3, 200)
INSERT INTO @Table VALUES (4, 200)

DELETE FROM @Table
OUTPUT Deleted.*
FROM  @Table t
      INNER JOIN (
        SELECT    ID = MAX(ID)
        FROM      @Table
        GROUP BY  PossibleDuplicate
        HAVING    COUNT(*) > 1
      ) d ON d.ID = t.ID

The OUTPUT statement shows the records that get deleted.

Update:

Above query will delete duplicates and give you the rows that are deleted, not the rows that remain. If that is important to you (all in all, the remaining 50 rows should be identical to the 50 deleted rows), you could use SQL Server's 2008 MERGE syntax to achieve this.

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1  
I'm liking the fact you've clearly displayed how to do it, while people with 4 and 10 times your rep are saying it isn't possible. – cjk Jan 28 '10 at 8:40
    
Just shows that no-one is (onmiscient) (omsincient) (omnicsient)... <sigh> knows everything. – Lieven Keersmaekers Jan 28 '10 at 9:09
    
+1 Wow, I already learned my something new today and it's still morning. :) – Mark Byers Jan 28 '10 at 10:52
    
Thanks a lot.This is very helpful. – SNA Jan 29 '10 at 12:41
    
How do we do it if a unique identifier (ID column in the example) column is not present in the table??? – singsuyash Nov 22 '13 at 6:17

Lieven's Answer is a good explanation of how to output the deleted rows. I'd like to add two things:

  1. If you want to do something more with the output other than displaying it, you can specify OUTPUT INTO @Tbl (where @Tbl is a table-var you declare before the deleted);

  2. Using MAX, MIN, or any of the other aggregates can only handle one duplicate row per group. If it's possible for you to have many duplicates, the following SQL Server 2005+ code will help do that:

 

;WITH Duplicates AS
(
    SELECT
        ID,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY DupeColumn ORDER BY ID) AS RowNum
)
DELETE FROM MyTable
OUTPUT deleted.*
WHERE ID IN
(
    SELECT ID
    FROM Duplicates
    WHERE RowNum > 1
)
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Sounds unlikely, at least in ANSI SQL, since a delete only returns the count of the number of deleted rows.

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