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I need to make a if-elseif-statement with 768 different elements.

Is there any possibility to make it less effort to write? I know its a strange question, but I need to test 768 different messages.

So the question exactly is:

Is there a easy way for mass if-statements or do I just have to type all line for line?

If anything is not clear, feel free to ask.

EDIT:

private static final String TEST = "0 0 0 0 0 40 ";
private static final String TEST2 = "0 96 0 0 0 d6 ";
private static final String TEST3 = "1 28 0 0 1 68 ";
private static final String TEST4 = "2 07 0 0 2 47 ";
private static final String TEST5 = "2 be 0 0 2 fe ";

if (data.contains(TEST)){
        progress = 0;
} else if (data.contains(TEST2)) {
        progress = 20;
} else if (data.contains(TEST3)) {
        progress = 40;
} else if (data.contains(TEST4)) {
        progress = 70;
} else if (data.contains(TEST5)) {
        progress = 96;
}

EDIT2:

Here some Sample data for mathematical research:

00 00 00 00 00 40 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 40 00 00
00 01 00 00 00 41 00 00
00 02 00 00 00 42 00 00
00 03 00 00 00 43 00 00
00 04 00 00 00 44 00 00
00 05 00 00 00 45 00 00
00 06 00 00 00 46 00 00
00 07 00 00 00 47 00 00
00 08 00 00 00 48 00 00
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 
01 00 00 00 01 40 00 00
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 
02 00 00 00 02 40 00 00
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
02 BF 00 00 02 FF 00 00

but sometimes on position 7 there is another hex number between 20 and 61. And thats the problem.

share|improve this question
    
reflection could be of help... I don't think using swith cases makes it any easier... –  TheLostMind Feb 3 '14 at 15:06
5  
Without any clue about what your conditions or actions will be, there's no way we can help you. –  Jon Skeet Feb 3 '14 at 15:07
1  
Well, we don't want to look at 768, but if you post a shorter snippet, we might be able to advise. –  Don Roby Feb 3 '14 at 15:07
1  
I would put those strings as resource with an index in the name, and the different progresses in an array, then you can use a for loop with an if inside to check data –  Ayoub Feb 3 '14 at 15:15
2  
Just out of curiosity, did you check whether there isn't a simple(r) mathematical formula that describes the relation between the input value and the desired output value? –  fvu Feb 3 '14 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I need to make a if-elseif-statement with 768 different elements.

No, you do not. You admit as much later in your question, when you wrote:

I need to test 768 different messages

This does not require "a if-elseif-statement with 768 different elements". While that may be one way to solve the problem, as you note, it is not a great solution.

Is there a easy way for mass if-statements or do I just have to type all line for line?

Do not do either of those.

Step #1: Get your test strings in an HashMap<String, Integer> (e.g., load them from an XML resource).

Step #2: Iterate over the keySet() of that HashMap, and test each key. If you have a match, set your progress equal to the corresponding value in the HashMap, and break out of the iteration loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Now as your answer seems the best until now, how do I load from an XML resource? Do I need an XML parser? –  Fraggles Feb 4 '14 at 7:41
1  
@Fraggles: Using an XML resource is merely one possibility. To go that route, create a res/xml/ directory in your project, and store in there an XML representation of your key-value pairs. Call getXml() on a Resources object (itself obtained via getResources() on a Context), passing in the appropriate R.xml.* ID of the resource. Use the XmlPullParser you get back to read in the XML. –  CommonsWare Feb 4 '14 at 12:40
    
Works well :) thx for your help –  Fraggles Feb 4 '14 at 13:24

Use a HashMap. Store the condition as the key, and the response as the value.

share|improve this answer
1  
how will a hashmap help? –  TheLostMind Feb 3 '14 at 15:10
1  
Well now that an actual code snippet is posted, a HashMap wouldn't be of much use. If we just needed a .equals() then a Map<String, Integer> would work fine in this case. –  mattingly890 Feb 3 '14 at 15:12
    
@TheLostMind, you will always have to somehow input the values to check with. Map will help with checking process. –  Pisek Feb 3 '14 at 15:15
    
You mean a LinkedHashMap, so that the ordering can be controlled. –  maaartinus Feb 3 '14 at 15:33
    
Yes if ordering is necessary. It depends how much of an equivalent the OP needs to a chain of 768 if-else statements. –  mattingly890 Feb 3 '14 at 15:58

Use the following:

static class TestWithProgress {
    final String test;
    final int progress;

    TestWithProgress(String test, int progress) {
        this.test = test;
        this.progress = progress;
    }
}

private static TestWithProgress[] TWIPS = new TestWithProgress[] {
    new TestWithProgress("0 0 0 0 0 40 ", 0),
    new TestWithProgress("0 96 0 0 0 d6 ", 20),
    ...
};

And now you may use a for loop:

for (TestWithProgress  twip : TWIPS) {
    if (data.contains(twip.test)) {
        progress = twip.progress;
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If I have to face this issue, I may use

Switch(str){
case:strCheck
}
share|improve this answer
4  
yes.. but still he will have to write 768 cases.. –  TheLostMind Feb 3 '14 at 15:10
3  
Switch statements on Strings requires Java 7. Android only supports up to Java 6 –  NickT Feb 3 '14 at 15:47

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