Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a boost multi index container thus.

using namespace boost::multi_index;
template < typename O >
class Container
{
public:
    multi_index_container<
        O,
        indexed_by<
            ordered_unique<
                const_mem_fun< O, std::string, &O::name >
            >
        >
    > _container;
};

As you can see, by this design every object I use to create this container has to have a member function returning a string with the name "name".

This is obviously not ideal. I tried a couple of ways of passing in the "key" but I can't get any of them to work..

I tried this..

using namespace boost::multi_index;
template < typename O, typename KT, typename KM >
class Container
{
public:
    multi_index_container<
        O,
        indexed_by<
            ordered_unique<
                const_mem_fun< O, KT, &KM >
            >
        >
    > _container;
};

int main( int c, char *v[] )
{
    Container< Object, std::string, Object::name > container;
}

but no joy..

the compiler complains that Object::name isn't a type but I'm not sure how to correct this. And even if I work out how to supply a type to the template, I'll still need a concrete instance of "Object::name" to be used by the container..

maybe I have to hand in the types and then and in the member function at construction? but then how do I construct the container .. My head hurts!?!

Alexy, below, kindly offered this solution

using namespace boost::multi_index;
template < typename O, typename KT, KT (O::* KM)() >
class Container
{
public:
    multi_index_container<
        O,
        indexed_by<
            ordered_unique<
                const_mem_fun< O, KT, KM >
            >
        >
    > _container;
};

int main( int c, char *v[] )
{
    Container< Object, std::string, &Object::name > container;  // <<---- ERROR HERE
}

However, this produded the following compiler error.

Template parameter KM requires an expression of type std::string (Object::*)().

at the line marked..

Ok. It turns out this was my fault by handing in an incorrectly signatured "&Object::name" parameter... I have fixed this..

share|improve this question
    
You might consider finding a name for your template arguments that is a little harder to confuse with a number literal. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 28 '10 at 9:39
    
Hi David, I agree. I only chose those arguments for my example. –  ScaryAardvark Jan 28 '10 at 12:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change class definition.

template < typename O, typename KT, KT (O::* KM)() >
class Container 
//...

and use KM instead of &KM.

share|improve this answer
    
Alexey. This almost worked.. I'm getting a different error now. I've editted my post with your example to show the error. –  ScaryAardvark Jan 28 '10 at 9:01
    
Alexy.. I should never have doubted you.. The compiler error I received was due to the object being used in the container having the wrong signature...... –  ScaryAardvark Jan 28 '10 at 9:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.