Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have situation where in the regular expression is something like this: ^b?A+b?$

So b may match at the start of the string 0 or 1 times, and A must match one or more times. Again b may match at the end of the string 0 or 1 times.

Now I want to modify this regular expression in such way that it may match b either at the start or at the end of the string, but not both.

How do I do this?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Theres a nice "or" operator in regexps you can use.

^(b?A+|A+b?)$
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I wanted, thanks guys for all your answers –  Ngm Jan 28 '10 at 9:02
    
+1, this works too, and you got it right on the first attempt. :) –  Mark Byers Jan 28 '10 at 9:03

Although the other answers have covered the regex portion, for future reference, I find it can be easier to visualise these problems as the state machine the regex represents;

^b?A+b?$

= b can repeat at the start of the expression 0 or 1 times, and A can repeat more than once. Again b can repeat at the end of the expression 0 or 1 times.

= 1 b, infinite a, 0 b
OR 0 b, infinite a, 0 b
OR 0 b, infinite a, 1 b

Automata1


"Now I want to modify this regular expression in such way that it will either allow repetition of "b" at the start or at the end, but not both."

Automata2

This is "^(bA+|A+b?)$". You can see the top branch is "bA+", then the bottom branch "A+b?".

share|improve this answer

Try this:

^(bA+|A+b?)$

This allows a b at the start and then at least one A, or some As at the start and optionally a b at the end. This covers all the possibilities and is slightly faster than the accepted answer in the case that it doesn't match as only one of the two options needs to be tested (assuming A cannot begin with b).

Just to be different from the other answers here, if the expression A is quite complex but b is simple, then you might want to do it using a negative lookahead to avoid repeating the entire expression for A in your regular expression:

^(b(?!.*b$))?A+b?$

The second might be more readable if your A is complex, but if performance is an issue I'd recommend the first method.

share|improve this answer
    
Now ^ applies only to first part of the | and $ applies only to the second part. –  Amarghosh Jan 28 '10 at 8:59
    
@Amarghosh: Fixed, thanks.... –  Mark Byers Jan 28 '10 at 8:59
^(b+A+b?|b?A+b+)$

why doesn't that work?

share|improve this answer
1  
I thinks he wants bbAAA or AAAbb. –  Bobby Jan 28 '10 at 8:58
    
Actually b can repeat 0 or 1 times, and not more than 1 times –  Ngm Jan 28 '10 at 9:02
    
@Ngm: the word "repeat" is misleading; see how I edited your question for a better way to express your goal (I hope). @Dan: in addition to the "0 or 1" issue, your regex matches 'b' at both the beginning and the end of the string, which the OP doesn't want. –  Alan Moore Jan 28 '10 at 16:53
1  
bad instructions if you had to edit his post, IMO –  Dan Beam Jan 29 '10 at 18:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.