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I would like to pass the single capture of a reg-ex as a scalar to a subroutine, how do I go about doing this? Here is an example:

sub myfunc($)
{
   my ($value)=@_;

   # Do something with $value...
}

# This is the data we want to parse
my $some_var='value: 12345'; # For example

# We want to extract the value '12345' from $some_var 
# and pass it to the myfunc subroutine as a scalar

# Attempt #1: This doesn't work    
myfunc($some_var=~/value: (\d+)/);

# Attempt #2: This does work, but seems overly complicated
myfunc(join('',$some_var=~/value: (\d+)/));

Is there a better way than Attempt #2?

Update:

Oesor's answer gives exactly what I was looking for to avoid calling join:

myfunc(($some_var=~/value: (\d+)/)[0]);
share|improve this question
    
Not sure but would changine the prototype to myfunc(@) help? – sln Feb 3 '14 at 17:22
    
@sln yes, it would but you can skip it, which leads to question why and when to use them in the first place. – Сухой27 Feb 3 '14 at 17:24
4  
@MichaelGoldshteyn. No, you are saying take the first argument to the sub and treat it as a scalar. That is not the same thing. – mob Feb 3 '14 at 17:28
1  
I guess my understanding of prototypes is incomplete and/or in error. – Michael Goldshteyn Feb 3 '14 at 17:31
2  
See SO question Why are Perl 5's function prototypes bad? (the title is misleading as they aren't always bad) – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 3 '14 at 17:38
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Generally the answer is to not use prototypes. You use one value by how you handle the argument list, rather than imposing context on it:

sub myfunc { 
  my ($val) = @_; 
  say $val;
}; 
my $var = 'value: 12345'; 
myfunc($var =~ /value: (\d+)/);
myfunc(qw/1 2 3 4 5/)

emits:

12345
1

You can use a list slice to take a subset of a list (in this case, the first item) which then has scalar context imposed on it:

sub myfunc($) { 
  my ($val) = @_; 
  say $val;
}; 
my $var = 'value: 12345'; 
myfunc(($var =~ /value: (\d+)/)[0]);

emits:

12345

This allows the regex operator to operate in list context and return the list of results rather than the imposed scalar context which will return the number of results, slices off a single element list, which then has the scalar context imposed on the first item in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
And you get the checkmark for answering the question that I asked, rather than trying to change it to fit a different answer. – Michael Goldshteyn Feb 3 '14 at 17:38
    
+1 Yes, should be slice, list context first element. (was this a test?) – sln Feb 3 '14 at 17:39

Yes there is a better way! Use the $ capture group variables.

 $some_var =~ /value: (\d+)/;
 myfunc($1);

You can also chain and nest them:

$some_var =~ /(\w+): (\d+)/;
# now $1 eq "value" and $2 eq "12345"

# and
$some_var =~ /((\w+): (\d+))/;
# now $1 eq "value: 12345" and $2 eq "value" and $3 eq "12345"
share|improve this answer
    
This certainly will work, but it is even more verbose than my second example. I'm looking for a small change to my Attempt #1 to make it work correctly (i.e., something other than join). – Michael Goldshteyn Feb 3 '14 at 17:15
2  
Sorry, deleted my comment because it was incorrect, then you replied to it. In any case, I believe this is the clearest way. Your regex will never match more than one time, so why use an array to represent the data? – serafina Feb 3 '14 at 17:27

In case you want to test if match was successful in the first place, before unconditional function call

sub myfunc
{
   my ($value)=@_;

}

my $some_var='value: 12345'; # For example

myfunc($1) if $some_var =~ /value: (\d+)/;

# or
if (my ($var) = $some_var =~ /value: (\d+)/) {
  myfunc($var);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, those are some good examples of other ways of getting the capture out and doing something with it... – Michael Goldshteyn Feb 3 '14 at 17:50
3  
Most of the time checks are necessary to avoid all kinds of possible errors. – Сухой27 Feb 3 '14 at 17:52

Force array context by changing your prototype:

sub myfunc(@) {
    # Do something
}

or better yet, remove it all together:

sub myfunc {
    # Do something
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Even better, don't impose context with prototypes: perl -E "sub myfunc { say for @_ }; my $var = 'value: 12345'; myfunc($var =~ /value: (\d+)/);" emits '12345' – Oesor Feb 3 '14 at 17:24
2  
@MichaelGoldshteyn: You can use a list slice: perl -E "sub myfunc($) { say for @_ }; my $var = 'value: 12345'; myfunc(($var =~ /value: (\d+)/)[0]);" 12345 – Oesor Feb 3 '14 at 17:27
3  
Resist the temptation to go perlgolfing! – serafina Feb 3 '14 at 17:29
4  
$1 and siblings are common perl programming practice, while prototypes are not. – Сухой27 Feb 3 '14 at 17:33
1  
@MichaelGoldshteyn: there's actually more implicit steps taking place in the answer you accepted than serafina's whether you like $1 or not. I also find splitting it up more readable. – user3183018 Feb 3 '14 at 17:47

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