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My problem is very simple. I would like to compute the following sum.

from __future__ import division
from scipy.misc import comb
import math

for n in xrange(2,1000,10):
    m = 2.2*n/math.log(n)
    print sum(sum(comb(n,a) * comb(n-a,b) * (comb(a+b,a)*2**(-a-b))**m
                    for b in xrange(n+1))
               for a in xrange(1,n+1))

However python gives RuntimeWarning: overflow encountered in multiply and nan as the output and it is also very very slow.

Is there a clever way to do this?

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2  
For a start, get rid of the []; you don't need those intermediate lists. –  larsmans Feb 3 at 18:55
1  
comb(n,a) means n!/(a!)*(n-a)! –  emcas88 Feb 3 at 19:10
    
Have you considered cython? –  mbatchkarov Feb 3 at 19:10
7  
Or replace comb with scipy.special.binom and replace the two inner loops by vectorized evaluation over a=numpy.arange(1,n+1); b=numpy.arange(n+1) –  pv. Feb 3 at 19:14
2  
well assuming the previously asked, first of all you dont need those list like @larsmans said, and in the second place you can compute the comb in a matrix to retrieve it later in O(1). Hope it helps. –  emcas88 Feb 3 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The reason why you get NaNs is you end up evaluating numbers like

comb(600 + 600, 600) == 3.96509646226102e+359

This is too large to fit into a floating point number:

>>> numpy.finfo(float).max
1.7976931348623157e+308

Take logarithms to avoid it:

from __future__ import division, absolute_import, print_function
from scipy.special import betaln
from scipy.misc import logsumexp
import numpy as np


def binomln(n, k):
    # Assumes binom(n, k) >= 0
    return -betaln(1 + n - k, 1 + k) - np.log(n + 1)


for n in range(2, 1000, 10):
    m = 2.2*n/np.log(n)

    a = np.arange(1, n + 1)[np.newaxis,:]
    b = np.arange(n + 1)[:,np.newaxis]

    v = (binomln(n, a) 
         + binomln(n - a, b) 
         + m*binomln(a + b, a) 
         - m*(a+b) * np.log(2))

    term = np.exp(logsumexp(v))
    print(term)
share|improve this answer
    
now dats a lot faster –  Claudiu Feb 3 at 19:42
    
OK.. so this is what they call a really great answer. It's the sort of thing SO should use to advertise itself! –  Anush Feb 3 at 19:51
    
@Anush Yeah it's called the "Hot Network Questions" to the right. That's how I found this neat Q & A. –  Dan Feb 4 at 0:04

Use the Memoize pattern. With that, redefine comb:

@memoized
def newcomb(a, b):
    return comb(a, b)

And replace all calls to comb with newcomb. Also, for a minor improvement, remove the brackets. If you make explicit lists, you waste time constructing them. If you remove them, you're effectively using generator expressions.

Update:

This won't solve the nan issue, but does make it a lot faster.

For everyone who does not see this as being faster, are you applying the memoize decorator? On my machine, the original function takes 29.7s to go up to 200, but only 3.8s with the memoized version.

What memoize does is simply store all your invocations of comb in a lookup table. So if in a later iteration you're invoking comb with the same arguments as you had at some point in the past, it doesn't recalculate it - it simply looks it up in the lookup table.

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How large an n can you do like this? In particular, does it help with n = 512? –  Anush Feb 3 at 19:26
    
doesn't seem to speed it up significantly, though i thought it would –  Claudiu Feb 3 at 19:30
    
@Anush: Not sure why it fails at 512. I modified your exponentiation to use math.pow and it now doesn't fail, but starts giving nans at 512. I suspect some expression is overflowing. Probably raising it to the power of m is the culprit - you may need to reformulate your expression to prevent this. –  user1462309 Feb 3 at 19:34
    
dont see how this "newcomb" is faster than "comb" ?? –  emcas88 Feb 3 at 19:36
    
For everyone who does not see this as being faster, are you applying the memoize decorator? On my machine, the original function takes 29.7s to go up to 200, but only 3.8s with the memoized version. What memoize does is simply stores all your invocations of comb in a lookup table. So if in a later iteration you're invoking comb with the same arguments as you had at some point in the past, it doesn't recalculate it - it simply looks it up in the lookup table. –  user1462309 Feb 3 at 19:43

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