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My Problem

I'm having trouble maintaining formatting and modifications applied to a matplotlib Axes object after offsetting the spines.

An example

Consider the following simplified work-flow:

%matplotlib inline
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def funky_formatting(ax):
    ax.set_xticks([0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9])
    ax.set_xticklabels(list('abcde'), rotation=60)

    ax.set_xticks([0.4, 0.6, 0.8], minor=True)
    ax.set_xticklabels(list('xzy'), rotation=-60, minor=True)

    ax.set_yticks([0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.8])
    ax.set_yticklabels(list('ABCD'), rotation=35)

    ax.tick_params(axis='both', labelsize=18, labelcolor='r')
    ax.set_ylabel('r$y_{\mathrm{ii}}$ test', color='b', fontweight='extra bold', fontsize=20)
    ax.set_xlabel('r$y_{\mathrm{ii}}$ test', color='r', fontweight='light', fontsize=16)

def offset_spines(ax):
    for spine in ax.spines.values():
        spine.set_position(('outward', 10))

# create two axes
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)

# format both axes the same way:
for ax in axes:
    funky_formatting(ax)

# offset the spines of only the top subplot
offset_spines(axes[0])

fig.tight_layout()

Which yields:

one good, one bad

As you can see, after offsetting the spines, I lost my x/y labels, tick placements, and tick labels, and (some) tick label formatting. Unfortunately, I cannot offset the spines prior to the rest of the axes formatting since my goal is to create a general function that will handle axes created by other functions that all format their axes very differently.

What I've tried so far

It is possible to cache a lot of these properties by hand:

# cache the properties - x-axis
xlabels = [t.get_text() for t in ax.get_xticklabels()]
xlabelrot = ax.get_xticklabels()[0].get_rotation()
xticks = ax.get_xticks()
xlabel = ax.get_xlabel()

# cache the properties - y-axis
ylabels = [t.get_text() for t in ax.get_yticklabels()]
ylabelrot = ax.get_yticklabels()[0].get_rotation()
yticks = ax.get_yticks()
ylabel = ax.get_ylabel()

# offset spines
for spine in ax.spines.values():
    spine.set_position(('outward', offset))


# restore properties - x-axis
ax.set_xticks(xticks)
ax.set_xticklabels(xlabels, rotation=xlabelrot)
ax.set_xlabel(xlabel)

# restore properties - y-axis
ax.set_yticks(yticks)
ax.set_yticklabels(ylabels, rotation=ylabelrot)
ax.set_ylabel(ylabel)

While that does the trick, it is:

  1. very repetitive
  2. needs to be about twice as long to cover the possibility of having minor tick labels.

The main question:

Is there a more efficient way to achieve this without manually picking up and restoring 2 properties x 2 axes x major+minor ticks + 2 labels?

share|improve this question
    
write your self a context manager! docs.python.org/2/library/contextlib.html –  tcaswell Feb 4 '14 at 1:31
    
Oh man @tcaswell. That might be a bit advanced for my skills. I don't even know where to start! I will definitely read up on those and see what happens. Thanks for the advice. –  Paul H Feb 4 '14 at 1:42
    
They seem scary because they use lots of fancy words to describe it. Basically you define a function to do something when you enter the context manager and a function to do something when you leave. You can wrap this up in a class/closure so that your function at the end knows what you cached at the beginning. The rest is syntax. –  tcaswell Feb 4 '14 at 1:45
    

1 Answer 1

I modified you code, and it can product the same ticks now.

%matplotlib inline
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.artist import ArtistInspector

def funky_formatting(ax):
    ax.set_xticks([0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9])
    ax.set_xticklabels(list('abcde'), rotation=60)
    ax.set_yticks([0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.8])
    ax.set_yticklabels(list('ABCD'), rotation=35)
    ax.tick_params(axis='both', labelsize=18, labelcolor='r')
    ax.set_ylabel('r$y_{\mathrm{ii}}$ test', color='b', fontweight='extra bold', fontsize=20)
    ax.set_xlabel('r$y_{\mathrm{ii}}$ test', color='r', fontweight='light', fontsize=16)

def try_update(artist, p):
    for k,v in p.iteritems():
        try:
            artist.update({k:v})
        except:
            pass    

def offset_spines(ax):
    for spine in ax.spines.values():
        paxis = spine.axis.properties()
        ptick = [label.properties() for label in spine.axis.get_ticklabels()]
        spine.set_position(('outward', 10))
        try_update(spine.axis, paxis)
        for label, p in zip(spine.axis.get_ticklabels(), ptick):
            p.pop("transform")
            try_update(label, p)

# create two axes
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)

# format both axes the same way:
for ax in axes:
    funky_formatting(ax)

# offset the spines of only the top subplot
offset_spines(axes[0])

fig.tight_layout()

Here is the output:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is a wonderful answer. I really appreciate it. I hate to move the goal post on you, but I tried tweaking my original problem and your solution to include minor ticks and labels and those don't come through. All I did was add a second line: pminortick = [label.properties() for label in spine.axis.get_ticklabels(minor=True)] and a second loop calling try_update on those labels. The ticks are there, but the labels are not. I'll edit my original figure. –  Paul H Feb 4 '14 at 16:46

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