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So I am calling a function within a view when a user clicks a button. This function requires a callback function. I have the callback defined within the same view. When The callback is called I want to render the current view with the additional info just obtained. However it seems like you lose scope within the callback function so that I get an error when calling this.render(); Saying "global object has not method render". So 'this' now refers to the window object. How do I retain scope within my view? So here is an example of what Im talking about.

var profileView = Parse.View.extend({
    events: {
        "click #scan_item": "scanItem"
    },
    scanItem: function(){
        ScanItem(callback);
    },
    callback: function(info){
        this.render(info);
    },
    render: function(info){
        $(this.el).html(this.template({info: info}));
        return this;
    }
});
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marked as duplicate by Bergi, Felix Kling, Liath, Tim B, mu 無 Apr 6 at 9:40

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Please show the code tat is calling the callback. Also, what is that callback variable in ScanItem(callback)? –  hugomg Feb 4 at 2:45
    
if you take callback out of the literal, you can bind it to the literal so that "this" refers to the literal. –  dandavis Feb 4 at 3:43
    
Ya thanks Bergi I guess it was a duplicate. I fixed it using .bind() –  David Feb 5 at 0:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to bind your callback to the correct 'this'

Might work:

ScanItem(this.callback.bind(this))

(I don't know if this framework has a bind function)

Otherwise, old school :) Keep this in a variable in the enclosing scope

var that=this;
ScanItem(function(info){
  that.callback(info)
});

Why does the function passed to scanItem need to be defined as though it was a "method"? And should it have to know about the arguments being passed - why not just pass them all?

var that=this;
ScanItem(function(){
  that.render.apply(that,arguments);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. using .bind() did it. ScanItem is a method I was just trying to make a quick example but maybe should have written it explicitly. It is a google api method. Looks like service.nearbySearch(request, callback); –  David Feb 5 at 0:37

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