Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a current example of my problem: http://jsfiddle.net/JSce5/3/

I'm trying to accept numbers from input fields in the view, then pass the values to the controller, run a calculation, then return the new value as a new variable name to the view. I'm new to AngularJS and I'm still trying to figure out how to do the basics here. Any help or insight would be very appreciated. Thanks!

<div ng-controller="MainCtrl">

Amount: <input type="number" ng-init="amountone=28" ng-model="amountone"> Value: <input type="number" ng-init="valueone=300" ng-model="valueone">
<br />
Amount: <input type="number" ng-init="amounttwo=3.5" ng-model="amounttwo"> Value: <input type="number" ng-init="valuetwo=50" ng-model="valuetwo">
<br /><br />
=========================
<br /><br />
Test ratio: {{ amountone }}/{{ amounttwo}} = {{ ratioone }}<br />
Test ratio: {{ amounttwo }}/{{ amountone}} = {{ ratiotwo }}<br />
</div>

====

'use strict';

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.controller('MainCtrl', function ($scope) {
    console.log($scope);
    $scope.ratioone = $scope.amountone / $scope.amounttwo;
    $scope.ratiotwo = $scope.amounttwo / $scope.amountone;

});
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of using a function to do your calculation as @m59 suggestions, it may be more efficient to simply use watchers to update your calculations when things change:

'use strict';

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.controller('MainCtrl', function ($scope) {
    $scope.$watch('amountone + amounttwo', function() {
        $scope.ratioone = $scope.amountone / $scope.amounttwo;
        $scope.ratiotwo = $scope.amounttwo / $scope.amountone;
    });
});

Putting this in $watch instead of making it a function means that the computation will only occur when the value of amountone or amounttwo is actually changed. In the other example, it would occur every time that scope changes need to be checked.

Although it may be considered over-engineering in this case, it doesn't increase complexity and lends itself to readability.

This method is also good practice, because it helps maintain forward compatibility. For instance, someone may refactor this into a directive in 3 months so that they can throw it into a grid of records. Each item could have it's own rationone and ratiotwo. If there are 1000 items in your grid, then you've just potentially saved thousands of unnecessary computations. This is only one example, and these things happen all the time.

share|improve this answer
    
But isn't bad practice to use $watch in controller (or any kind of logic)? –  fabio Sep 13 '14 at 16:11
    
@fabio I've never heard of that as bad practice. Why would it be bad practice? Do you have any article describing that? –  monokrome Oct 7 '14 at 20:45

Use a function to do your calculation and return the result, then actually bind that function. The return value will be used for the binding.

$scope.ratioone = function() {
  return $scope.amountone / $scope.amounttwo;
};

HTML:

Test ratio: {{ amountone }}/{{ amounttwo}} = {{ ratioone() }}

Live demo (click).

Please also note that <br> should not be used for spacing in a layout. It is just for newlines within text like:

<p>This is some text.<br>And this is some more text.</p>

For layout spacing, apply CSS rules like margin, padding and display: block.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually tried this, but it didn't work because I made the mistake of using the variable like this {{ ratioone }} instead of this {{ ratioone() }} –  robotsushi Feb 4 '14 at 6:24

scope is an object that refers to the application model. It is an execution context for expressions. Scopes are arranged in hierarchical structure which mimic the DOM structure of the application. Scopes can watch expressions and propagate events, simple example at the below website.
AngularJS Scope and ng With Live Editor

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.