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I have following table:

+--------+-----------+--------+
|   ID   |  Title    |  Stat  |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    1   |  title a  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    1   |  title b  |    0   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    2   |  title c  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    2   |  title d  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    3   |  title e  |    0   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    3   |  title f  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    3   |  title g  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+

I need to construct a query, where as a result only those records would be included where ALL values in column Stat meet certain condition.

For above table, how to formulate a query that would basically mean: show me records for only those ID's that have all the values in column Stat = 1 and would as a result produce following table?

+--------+-----------+--------+
|    2   |  title c  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+
|    2   |  title d  |    1   |
+--------+-----------+--------+

Thanks.

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3  
Hmm... a non-unique ID column. I worry. –  middaparka Jan 28 '10 at 13:14
    
@middaparka: Nobody said that ID is the primary key here; maybe it's a foreign key. Having said that, I'm also curious how one can end up with a non-unique column called ID (assuming that it is aptly named). @Ales: you might get a better answer if you tell us more about the application / database schema. –  Martijn Jan 28 '10 at 13:19
    
It is actually named differently (id_member) and it is a foreign key. Basically I have table with members and another table with books those members have loaned. Loans table has key: (id_member, id_book). Every book can be marked as returned (1) or not returned (0). So I was asking for a query to find all members that have no loaned books. –  Ales Jan 28 '10 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

SELECT
  *
FROM table t
LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT
    MIN(Stat) AS Stat,
    ID
  FROM table
  GROUP BY ID
) minstat ON t.ID = minstat.ID
WHERE minstat.Stat = 1;

Basically, the subquery computes the minimum stat per ID, whereas the outer query only selects the rows with the minimal stat equal to 1. If all rows need to satisfy a certain condition, insert a boolean expression in stead of Stat in the minimum.

Not sure if this is possible without a subquery.

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Thanks man, been trying to figure this one out for hours :) –  Ales Jan 28 '10 at 13:27
    
Welcome. Still curious though, might be that you can improve the database schema to avoid this kind of strange queries –  Martijn Jan 28 '10 at 13:28

This also works,

SELECT * FROM tablename t1  
WHERE (
        SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tablename t2 
        WHERE t1.ID = t2.ID AND t2.STAT = 0
      ) = 0

this query checks, is where a STAT with value 0 in records with same ID.

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Yep, this one works as well, only, when you have lots of records, Martijn's solution seems to be much faster. Thanks anyway. –  Ales Jan 28 '10 at 13:53

How about this:

select * from t where not (id in (select id from t where stat=0));
share|improve this answer
    
Ales states that my solution is the slowest. But in my opinion it is the fastest in human comprehension and reproduction time. And since Ales was "..trying to figure this one out for hours..." this may well be a critical factor. –  Alex Monthy Jan 28 '10 at 23:32

All 3 suggested solutions above work well, difference is only in the speed of execution. On a table where 3 records are found among approximately 7000 results are:

Martijn's: Showing rows 0 - 2 (3 total, Query took 0.0069 sec)

Alex's: Showing rows 0 - 2 (3 total, Query took 0.1162 sec)

Pavelasc's: Showing rows 0 - 2 (3 total, Query took 0.6160 sec)

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