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I'm new to Java, and I've read over some tutorials on overriding methods, but an example I'm looking at isn't working the way I expect. For example, I have the code:

public class A{
    public void show(){
        System.out.println("A");
    }
    public void run(){
        show();
    }
    public static void main( String[] arg ) {
        new A().run();
    }
}
public class B extends A{
    @Override
    public void show(){
        System.out.println("B");
    }
}

When I instantiate and call B.run(), I would expect to see "B" outputted. However, I see "A" instead. What am I doing wrong?

Edit: Yes, the classes are in two separate files. They're shown together for brevity.

Edit: I'm not sure how B is being instantiated, as it's being done by a third-party program using a classloader.

Edit: More info on the third-party program. It starts by calling A.main(), which I didn't initially show (sorry). I'm assuming I need to make "new A().run();" more generic to use the name of the current class. Is that possible?

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5  
How are you instantiating and calling this? –  Travis Gockel Jan 28 '10 at 13:35
7  
@Prasoon: Who said they were in one file? –  T.J. Crowder Jan 28 '10 at 13:38
    
Much better after the edit :-). –  Prasoon Saurav Jan 28 '10 at 13:49
1  
@Prasoon There was no mention of file, only classes. We couldn't infer the actual files they were in. –  KLE Jan 28 '10 at 13:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That code will output B if you:

(new B()).run();

Whatever the problem is, it's not in the code you've quoted.

Updated (after your edit)

If the third-party program is calling A.main(), there's nothing (reasonable) you can do in B that will inject itself into A. As long as A.main is doing new A().run(), it's going to have an instance of A, not an instance of B. There's no "current class name" to use, or if there is (depends on your point of view), it's A, not B.

You'll have to get the third-party program to call B in some way, rather than A, or just modify A directly (e.g., getting rid of B entirely). You do not want to modify A to make it use B; that tightly binds it to a descendant and makes the separation between them largely pointless.

Hope that helps.

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It's a shame Java doesn't expose the current class the code resides in. I'm more familiar with Python, where I'd be able to do type(self) or explicitly define main() as a classmethod. Anyways, I ended up simply giving B its own main() that instantiates B directly, and that fixes the problem. –  Cerin Jan 28 '10 at 15:23
    
@Chris: The problem isn't that Java doesn't expose it (it does; within an instance method, this.getClass() gives you the Class instance that tells you everything you need to know about the class; if you're in a class (static) method, you already know what class you're in and can use the name -- e.g., A -- directly to get the Class instance). That's not the problem you're having. The problem you're having is that B just isn't involved in any way shape or form when A.main is called. B may as well not be there. It's not a language thing, it's a what-you're-trying-to-do thing. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jan 28 '10 at 15:50
    
@T.J. Crowder: Correct, but only because in Java I have no choice but to hardcode "new A()". In Python, main() could be a classmethod, whose first argument would automatically be "cls", so I could instantiate the class by simply doing "cls()". This would be inheritable, so I wouldn't have to write a separate main() for B. –  Cerin Jan 28 '10 at 15:58
    
@Chris: But again, so you instantiate with cls(). You're still going to be instantiating an A, not a B! This is my point: B is just totally not involved in the code that starts things off (in the third-party tool) is calling A and A has no knowledge of B. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 28 '10 at 16:14
    
@T.J. Crowder: I think I see the miscommunication. The third party tool isn't hardcoded to use A. I pass that in as an argument. What I don't understand is how to get A's main() to create an instance of the class it's inside, whether directly in A or inherited from B. –  Cerin Jan 28 '10 at 18:55

I tried, putting your two classes in two files, and it worked nicely, outputting "B". I called :

 B b = new B();
 b.run();

UPDATED : Also works as (because it is the same runtime instance):

 A a = new B();
 a.run();
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1  
A a = new B() should work fine also (unless the methods are static). –  Nate Jan 28 '10 at 13:41
    
@Bedwyr The output is just the same! :-) –  KLE Jan 28 '10 at 13:41

Works for me.

Here's my code for A and B:

package so;

public class A{
    public void show(){
        System.out.println("A");
    }
    public void run(){
        show();
    }
}

class B extends A{
    @Override
    public void show(){
        System.out.println("B");
    }
}

Here's my entry point:

package so;

public class EntryPoint {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B b = new B();
        b.run();
    }
}

It prints out 'B'.

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It depends of instantiating. Try this:

 A v1 = new A();
 A v2 = new B();
 B v3 = new A();
 B v4 = new B();

 v1.run()
 v2.run()
 v3.run()
 v4.run()
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3  
B v3 = new A(); will not compile, it is impossible ! –  KLE Jan 28 '10 at 13:40
    
This will result in a compilation error on line 3. A is not of type B. –  Michael Krauklis Jan 28 '10 at 13:40
    
Yes, I know it, but this result is a usefull experience. –  demas Jan 28 '10 at 13:44
1  
Then I suggest writing a comment on the line, to warn unsuspecting readers... Because for one that might (?) try it, hundreds will read it! ;-) –  KLE Jan 28 '10 at 13:46

I tried your example and my output was B.

How are you instantiating? Here's the exact code I ran.

public class Test {
    public static class A {
        public void show() {
            System.out.println("A");
        }

        public void run() {
            show();
        }
    }

    public static class B extends A {
        @Override
        public void show() {
            System.out.println("B");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        A a = new B();

        a.run();
    }
}
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If your external program instantiates A, you will have A, not B.

But you can try something like this, using some reflection, and pass "com.mypackage.A" or "com.mypackage.B" as arguments to your program.

With this code (exception catch missing), you will be able to print "A" or "B" depending on the string parameter that you pass.

public static void main( String[] arg ) {
    String className = arg[0];
    Class myClass  = Class.forName(className);
    Constructor cons = myClass.getConstructor(new Class[0]);
    A myObject = (A) cons.newInstance(new Object[0]);
    myObject.show();

}
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