Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently wrote a simple tcp server using winsock using an online guide. I then tried to multithread it without the help of a guide. After a little struggle I ended up succeeding, but only by detaching the threads.

I have an infinite loop that whenever accept() returns a SOCKET, it creates a Handler, and calls handle() with the SOCKET result of accept() passed to it. This is the handle() function which takes the socket from the accept() call and creates the thread which calls processData:

void Handler::handle(SOCKET socket)
{
    std::thread handlerThread([socket]{
        processData(socket);
    });
}

Here is the actual processData function, which is a static function in Handler:

void Handler::processData(SOCKET socket)
{
    try
    {
        const int buffLength = 512;
        char recvBuff[buffLength];
        int recvResult = recv(socket, recvBuff, buffLength, 0);

        if(recvResult > 0)
        {
            std::cout << recvBuff << std::endl;
        }

        closesocket(socket);
    }
    catch(std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cerr << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
}

This code would abort() on the recv() call with the code R6010 somehow escaping the try-catch. It wasn't until I changed the handle function to this:

void Handler::handle(SOCKET socket)
{
    std::thread handlerThread([socket]{
        processData(socket);
    });

    handlerThread.detach();
}

that it was able to get past the recv() call.

If anyone could explain why detaching the thread had an effect on recv() and knows if there is a more desired design pattern where you do not have to detach the worker threads, I would be very thankful if you would share it with me.

If that is too specific, maybe give your opinion on when it is ok to detach a thread.

share|improve this question
    
You sure it's the recv() call that blows and not the cout stream? When you detach the threads, what is output? What happens if you call cout.write(recvBuff,recvResult)? –  Martin James Feb 4 at 9:20
    
I debugged it and it didn't get past the recv call. When I detatch, I get the output I expect that was sent from a local TCP client application. I think @mkaes was able to figure it out. –  Matt Vaughan Feb 4 at 9:34
add comment

2 Answers 2

From the Spec:

30.3.1.3 thread destructor [thread.thread.destr] ~thread(); If joinable(), calls std::terminate(). Otherwise, has no effects.

In your first case the destructor is called when the handle returns as your thread object is on the stack. Since your underlaying thread is still running and blocked in the recv function std::terminate() gets called. Which eventually lead to the abort() call.
When you detach the thread you can destroy the std::thread object because it is no longer joinable.

I personally try to avoid detached threads. So I would prefer in your case either a thread pool or you keep track of your thread objects by storing them e.g in a vector.

share|improve this answer
    
Why doesn't it terminate at an earlier point in time, like the line const int buffLength = 512;? Does the handlerThread just execute so fast that it gets to the blocking recv call, and then the handle function catches up and returns, thereby destructing handlerThread? –  Matt Vaughan Feb 4 at 9:29
    
It is always hard to reason about multi threaded issues. In theory it can terminate at any place. I think on windows your thread will keep executing as long as you see the abort window. At least with asserts there was some kind of strange behavior and maybe with abort too. –  mkaes Feb 4 at 9:47
add comment

As already answered by @mkaes, as long as the thread is not detached, it works in the context of the thread object, so it is stopped when the object is destroyed.

As far as threads are concerned, I either work with temporary threads or with static threads. Typically, on servers, static threads should not be stopped, so they can be detached. For temporary threads, you either want some result, so you have to join them at some point or you don't, so they can be detached.

The problem with threads in general is gracefully ending your application. This is even harder if you have detached threads, because even if you signal them to stop, you need an extra mechanism to find out whether all threads have ended (and even then you're never 100% sure), so that seems the main reason to avoid detached threads.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.