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I was about to write a C++ function doing the following:

1 ---> "1st"
2 ---> "1nd"
3 ---> "3rd"
...
17657 --> "17657th"
...

i.e. produces the ordinal extension string for that number (it doesn't have to do an itoa() of the number itself). But then I thought "surely something in the standard library or boost does this already?"

Notes:

  • I know it's not hard to write this, there's an implementation in Python right here on SO, I just don't want to duplicate code.
  • I need this in English, obviously. A multi-language version would be nice for political-correctness considerations, not more than that...
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2  
I doubt that, this is very language-specific. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 4 at 9:11
    
It's NOT terribly hard to write such a function. You need a "int to string", some simple math/string work to figure out the "low end of the number" and a couple of if/case statements. But like Luchian says, this is different in different languages (and in some languages depends on the "gender" of the object being counted - e.g. if you are counting cows, it's one way, if you count bulls, it's a different way - I believe this is the case in Spanish for example). –  Mats Petersson Feb 4 at 9:15
    
@LuchianGrigore True, but in fairness, so is (for example) the symbol used as the decimal separator. –  hvd Feb 4 at 9:16
    
@MatsPetersson: See my note. –  einpoklum Feb 4 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

I'm pretty sure you can adapt the four line solution at php display number with ordinal suffix. Unfortunately, I don't think there is such a thing in a common C++ lib.

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try this...

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void suffix(int n, char suff[]);
// creates the ordinal suffix
// for a given number

int main()
{
  char s[5];
  int x;

  cout << "Enter a number to find the ordinal suffix for ";
  cin >> x;
  suffix(52111,s);
}

void suffix(int n, char suff[])
{
   if(n%100 == 11 || n%100 == 12 || n%100 == 13)
    {
      cout << "suffix is: " << n << "th";
      cout << endl;
    }
  else
    {
      if(n%10 == 1)
    {
      cout << "Suffix is: " << n << "st";
      cout << endl;
    }
      else
    {
      if(n%10 == 2)
        {
          cout << "Suffix is: " << n << "nd";
          cout << endl;
        }
      else
        {
          if(n%10 == 3)
        {
          cout << "Suffix is: " << n << "rd";
          cout << endl;
        }
          else
        {
          if(n%10 == 4 || n%10 == 5 || n%10 == 6 || n%10 == 7 || n%10 == 8 || n%10 == 9 || n%10 == 0)
              {
            cout << "Suffix is: " << n << "th";
            cout << endl;
              }
        }
        }
    }
    }
}
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How will your code work for "100"? Or "147"? (And the code could be written MUCH simpler!) –  Mats Petersson Feb 4 at 9:23
    
In other words, there are bugs in the above code, but conceptually resembles how I would solve it. –  Mats Petersson Feb 4 at 9:24
    
@hvd: Really? Have you tried it? Even stepping through the code, I've identified that it won't do that. (Well, not 147th, at least - just spotted the odd placement of zero in the last if. Won't work for 120 tho') –  Mats Petersson Feb 4 at 9:25
    
@MatsPetersson It really does work for 100, but it wouldn't work for 147, you're right, I missed that. I incorrectly read some of the %100s as %10 (as no doubt intended). –  hvd Feb 4 at 9:29
    
Edited:- not it will work for both 100 and 147 –  Indra Yadav Feb 4 at 9:36

I used the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

string get_suffix(int n);

int main()
{
    int n;
    cout << "Enter a number: ";
    cin >> n;
    cout << n << get_suffix(n);
}

string get_suffix(int n)
{
    string num_s = to_string(n);
    string return_s = "";

    switch (num_s.back())
    {
    case '1': return_s = "st"; break;
    case '2': return_s = "nd"; break;
    case '3': return_s = "rd"; break;
    default: return_s = "th";
    }
    if (num_s.length() > 1){
        num_s.pop_back();
        if (num_s.back() == '1')
        {
        return_s = "th";
        }
    }
    return return_s;
}

The function get_suffix takes an integer n and returns the ordinal suffix of that number as a string.

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