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I am trying to establish equality of three equal variables, but the following code is not printing the obvious true answer which it should print. Can someone explain, how the compiler is parsing the given if condition internally?

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
        int i = 123, j = 123, k = 123;
        if ( i == j == k)
                printf("Equal\n");
        else
                printf("NOT Equal\n");
        return 0;
}

Output:

manav@workstation:~$ gcc -Wall -pedantic calc.c
calc.c: In function ‘main’:
calc.c:5: warning: suggest parentheses around comparison in operand of ‘==’
manav@workstation:~$ ./a.out
NOT Equal
manav@workstation:~$

EDIT:

Going by the answers given below, is the following statement okay to check above equality?

if ( (i==j) == (j==k))
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1  
You need ( (i==j) && (j==k) ) –  SF. Jan 28 '10 at 15:07
    
Your edit tests if i == j has the same value as j == k. What happens for i = 1, j = 2, k = 3? Don't guess, try to figure it out: for example, what is the value of 1 == 2? –  Alok Singhal Jan 28 '10 at 15:11
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4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted
  if ( (i == j) == k )

  i == j -> true -> 1 
  1 != 123 

To avoid that:

 if ( i == j && j == k ) {

Don't do this:

 if ( (i==j) == (j==k))

You'll get for i = 1, j = 2, k = 1 :

 if ( (false) == (false) )

... hence the wrong answer ;)

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Is coding like if ( (i==j) == (j==k)) okay ??? –  Manav Jan 28 '10 at 14:54
1  
@Manav, No. Use && between the conditionals. –  jmucchiello Jan 28 '10 at 14:57
    
It's "fine" but it doesn't make sense. That said "if the equality of i and j is the same as the equality of j and k." All three being different would make it true. You want &&, which means and. –  GManNickG Jan 28 '10 at 14:57
1  
No. (i==j) == (j==k) is equivalent to (i==j) ^ (j==k). which means it will be true if i==j and j==k or if i!=j and j!=k. Because (i==j) returns a true or false value. –  SurDin Jan 28 '10 at 14:58
2  
@SurDin, they're not equivalent, they are in fact quite opposite (and only if I ignore the types of the results). –  avakar Jan 28 '10 at 15:21
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You need to separate the operations:

  if ( i == j && i == k)
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I'd heed the compiler's warning and write it as (i==j) && (j==k). It takes longer to write but it means the same thing and is not likely to make the compiler complain.

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1  
And it's more clear. Readability is key. –  Mike Pateras Jan 28 '10 at 14:51
    
Just to be picky, the compiler is actually warning that you're comparing a comparison. –  Josh Lee Jan 28 '10 at 15:02
    
Although that's obviously the meaning Manav intended, that's not the change the compiler suggested. Heeding the compiler's warning would give you this code: (i == j) == k. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 28 '10 at 15:04
    
True: although the compiler said suggest parentheses around comparison in operand of ‘==’ but since it didn't specify WHICH '==', I just parenthesised both of 'em! ;) –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jan 28 '10 at 15:06
    
More importantly, it does the right thing, while i == j == k doesn't. –  Mike Seymour Jan 28 '10 at 15:08
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Expression

i == j == k

is parsed as

(i == j) == k

So you compare i to j and get true. Than you compare true to 123. true is converted to integer as 1. One is not equal 123, so the expression is false.

You need expression i == j && j == k

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