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I hear a lot about performance problems about lazy loading, no matter if at NHibernate, Linq....

The problem is N+1 selects. Example, I want all posts and its users, at foreach I lazy Load Users, them I need one select for posts, plus N select for each user.

Lazy Loading:

1 - select ....from post N - select ....from user

The "good" approach is do a join:

1 - select .....from post inner join user on post.UserId = user.Id

But seeing EF generated SQL, I realized that a lot of data is wasted. Imagine that all posts are the same User. Inner Join will bring all users columns for each post row.

In performance, which approach is best?

share|improve this question
    
This is a good question -- how to choose -- but I think the answer will depend a lot on the data. However, I'd think that you'd be surprised that multiple queries are often worse than "data wasted" by returning more than you need. In other words, there are cases where lazy loading is good, but surprisingly few in "typical" applications. – Dan Rosenstark Jan 28 '10 at 15:01
    
Your answer also depends on your ORM, because in the EF, to use your example, these are not the only two options. – Craig Stuntz Jan 28 '10 at 17:25
    
@Craig Stuntz Which others options? I am using EF4 – Fujiy Jan 28 '10 at 19:10
    
In EF (any version), you can explicitly load, eager load, or project. In EF 4, you can lazily load, too. IMHO projection is most frequently the right choice, as it allows things which are impossible with any of the other options. – Craig Stuntz Jan 28 '10 at 19:17
    
@Craig Stuntz, eager load is "Include()" method, project is "select { post, post.user}", and load is this? "context.LoadProperty(beveragesCategory, c => c.Products);" – Fujiy Jan 28 '10 at 23:40
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Lazy loading is neither good nor bad. See this for a more lengthy explanation:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1682165/when-should-one-avoid-using-nhibernates-lazy-loading-feature/1686795#1686795

In general, lazy loading is a good default behavior for an ORM, but as an ORM user you need to be conscious of when to override the default and load data eagerly. Profiling the performance of your application is the best way to make decisions about using lazy loading or not using it. Be wary of spending too much effort on premature optimization.

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1  
+1 for a shameless plug <g> – Lieven Keersmaekers Jan 28 '10 at 15:08
    
I think the general rule is DBA's don't like it and web application developers do :) – Aim Kai Jan 28 '10 at 19:58

Most of my applications involve a service boundary (web service, WCF, etc) and at that point lazy loading at the OR/M is pointless, and implementing lazy loading in your entities that sit on top of your service is kind of a bad idea (the entities now must know about the service).

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The issue with Lazy Loading is being aware of what it is and when it can bite you. You need to be aware of how many potential trips could be made to the database, and how to work around that. I don't view LL as being bad. I just need to be aware of the ramifications of it.

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There's no ugly and beautiful for lazy loading. You must decide whether you prefer to load resources on run time or application loading times. For instance - Real time usually uses a buffer to avoid allocating resources on runtime. That's the opposite of lazy-loading and is beneficial for Real-Time software.

Lazy loading is useful if you have an application that runs for a long time and you don't wish to allocate resources on startup.

share|improve this answer

There's no bad and good for lazy loading. You have to decide if you prefer to load resources on run time or application loading times. For example - Real time usually uses a buffer to avoid allocating resources on runtime. That's the opposite of lazy loading and is beneficial for Real Time software.

Lazy loading is beneficial if you have an application that runs for long duration and you don't want to allocate resources on startup.

share|improve this answer

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