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I have the following two arrays:

a = np.mat('5;5;1;4;3;2;1;5;3')
b = np.zeros((9,9))

The array a is a cluster assignment, where each object (represented by a row) is assigned to a given cluster (represented by a number). I have multiple such cluster assignments and would like to count in the array b how often each pair of objects co-occur in the same cluster. In Matlab, I'd write something like the following:

b(a==5,a==5) = b(a==5,a==5) + 1

The output would be:

 b =
      1     1     0     0     0     0     0     1     0
      1     1     0     0     0     0     0     1     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
      1     1     0     0     0     0     0     1     0
      0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

For example, b(2,8) == 1 (using Matlab indexing starting at 1) because both elements 2 and 8 are in cluster 5.

The indexing system is quite different in NumPy and I was wondering how to do the same thing there?

UPDATE:

zhangxaochen's solution using b[m&m.T]+=1 gives correct results. I've also come up with the following way:

c = np.nonzero(a == 5)[0]
b[c.T,c] +=1

Are there any strong reasons to use one over the other? I work with large arrays with tens of thousands of rows/columns.

share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example output? –  Ophion Feb 4 at 14:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

In [1149]: m=(a==5)

In [1150]: b[m+m.T]+=1

In [1151]: b
Out[1151]: 
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.]])

UPDATE:

From your comment I guess what you need is &:

In [1220]: b[m&m.T]+=1

In [1221]: b
Out[1221]: 
array([[ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

BENCHMARK:

In [1285]: %%timeit
      ...: d=1000
      ...: b=np.zeros((d,d))
      ...: a=arange(d)>(d/2)
      ...: at=a[:,None]
      ...: b[a&at]+=1
      ...: 
10 loops, best of 3: 32.5 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately not. The output array has value 1 in position (0,2), which is incorrect since the two elements are in different clusters (5 and 1, respectively). –  John Manak Feb 4 at 15:50
    
@JohnManak updated –  zhangxaochen Feb 4 at 15:53
    
Cheers, I've added the example output and it currently gives correct results. However, is it efficient? If I understood it correctly, you need to create a temporary array with good.shape[0]^2 elements, which can get quite pricey for large arrays. –  John Manak Feb 4 at 16:09
    
@JohnManak yes it creates a tem 2D array using numpy broadcasting, but I don't think it's too much pricey, updated –  zhangxaochen Feb 4 at 16:50

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