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The title says it all. When I use the fat-arrow in CoffeeScript, it stores this first before calling the function. For example:

class myClass
    constructor: ->
        element = $ "#id"
        element.click ->
            @myMethod(@value)
            return
        return

    myMethod: (c)->
        window.console.log(c)
        return

would yield

var myClass;

myClass = (function() {
  function myClass() {
    var element;
    element = $("#id");
    element.click(function() {
      this.myMethod(this.value);
    });
    return;
  }

  myClass.prototype.myMethod = function(c) {
    window.console.log(c);
  };

  return myClass;

})();

Now on line#8 of JavaScript, this.myMethod is wrong. In this scope, this refers to element instead of the class MyClass.

However, if on line#4 of CoffeeScript, I replace element.click -> by element.click => the line#8 in JavaScript will become _this.myMethod(_this.val) where this referring to myClass is stored in _this before calling the function. But _this.value is undefined and even if it were defined, the object I'm trying to access here is element (which is referred to by the actual this keyword in scope of this function).

How would access the actual this now?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can achieve your goal in at least three ways. The 1st one would be:

class myClass
    constructor: ->
        element = $ "#id"
        element.click =>
            @myMethod(element.value)
            return
        return

    myMethod: (c) ->
        window.console.log(c)
        return

And the 2nd:

class myClass
    constructor: ->
        element = $ "#id"
        myMethodCallback = (c) => @myMethod(c)
        element.click ->
            myMethodCallback(@value)
            return
        return

    myMethod: (c) ->
        window.console.log(c)
        return

The 3rd one is as showed below. I'm not sure about jQuery API usage though, so better check on appropriate docs page.

class myClass
    constructor: ->
        element = $ "#id"
        element.click (event) =>
            @myMethod(event.target.value)
            return
        return

    myMethod: (c) ->
        window.console.log(c)
        return

I would prefer the 1st way as it seems to be more straightforward. This or the other but you need to decide 'which this' you would like to have in scope of the element.click callback. It's not possible to access two 'thises' at the same time.

By the way. All those return statements seems unnecessary. The shortest working solution would look like:

class myClass
    constructor: ->
        element = $ "#id"
        element.click => @myMethod(element.value)

    myMethod: (c) -> window.console.log(c)
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1  
A couple more options: (1) The old that = @ trick still works in CoffeeScript, (2) The click handler will still get an event passed as an argument even when it is fat-arrowed, you should be able extract the clicked element from that event. –  mu is too short Feb 4 '14 at 18:08
    
@muistooshort You are right. I was thinking about adding 3rd example with that = @, but that's the same as using fat arrow. Well almost the same, depends on context. I haven't been using jQuery for some time now so didn't think about your another suggestion. Of course you can access click subject from the event passed as argument jQuery API. –  topr Feb 4 '14 at 18:15
1  
The main difference between that = @ and => is that that = @ gives you access to both @s (that's a bit of a tongue twister :). I'm not criticizing, just figure that more options are better (that's my upvote up there). –  mu is too short Feb 4 '14 at 18:25
    
That's why I wrote that it's almost the same. Fat arrow was introduced to avoid need of using that = this trick, which was necessary in javascript. So using it and the old trick at the same time seems to be quite hacky. Anyway it's probably still cleaner than defining a method callback the line above, I guess (my 2nd example). Thanks for pointing this out :) –  topr Feb 4 '14 at 18:34
    
Thank you. I had all these options in mind. I was asking whether there is another symbol/keyword that stores the actual this inside the fat-arrow callback. I know all these methods. And the one discussed in comments i.e. that = @ is the one I use most frequently. Also, 2nd and 3rd methods in the answer above are applicable if I am using jQuery and I have precached the element, however I used that just as an example. This was kind of a dumb question I think now. Haha. Thanks for the help anyway. –  Zia Ur Rehman Feb 5 '14 at 2:39

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